Currier

Henry CURRIER

 

Thomas CURRIER 1570 - 1627 of Salisbury Eng

Spouse: Martha OSBORNE married 1/14/1610 St. Thomas' Salisbury

Children: Thomas born 1613-14; Richard; Margaret born 1619

 

Richard CURRIER born 5/3/1616 in Salisbury Wiltshire England, came to America 1640, original settler of Salisbury and of Amesbury, in Narragansett war, drowned 2/22/1686-7, planter and millwright, ancestors granted land in Buxton ME for his service in Narragansett War

Spouse: Ann _____ married prior to 1643 died 1675-6 (2) married 10/26/1676 Joanna Pindor Rowell Sargent died 1690, widow of Valentine Rowell and William Sargent, Richard lived with her son Philip the last years of his life

Children: Hannah, Thomas born 3/8/1646 in Salisbury MA married Mary Osgood had 9 sons & 3 daughters, died 1712; possibly Samuel born 3/8/1636 of Haverhill MA married Mary Hardy, died 1712-13

 

Hannah CURRIER born 7/8/1643 in Salisbury MA, married 6/23/1659 living in 1691, received land in Manchester in her father's will, died after 8/26/1708

Spouse: Samuel FOOT Capt. of Amesbury, Planter, takes by Indians in the assault on Amesbury and tortured to death 7/7/1690; married by 1/23/1659

Children: John born 7/9/1660 married Bathsheba

 


Genealogy of Richard Currier of Salisbury and Amesbury, Massachusetts: Hannah Currier only daughter of Richard and Ann Currier was born in Salisbury Mass July 8 1643. She married June 23 1659 Captain Samuel Foot of Amesbury Mass planter who received land in Amesbury in 1659, 1660, 1662, and 1668. He was a townsman in 1660, had seat in meeting house in 1667 being one of the favored three who were seated at the tabell. He took the oath of allegiance in 1677, frequently served as moderator held other local offices and was a representative to the General Court in 1689 and 1690. He was not a signer of the articles of agreement between the old and new town of Salisbury but took up his residence in the new town about 1658 when he was chosen one of a committee to lay out the river lots. He drew lot No 1 which lay along the western side of the Buttonwood road but cut off from the river by John Weed's ten acre lot. He lived at a place called Jamaca and it is very probable that his house was the garrison house several times spoken of in Merrill's History of Amesbury as Captain Foot's fort. He was taken by the Indians in the assault on Amesbury and tortured to death July 7 1690. She died after August 26 1708, she having witnessed her brother's will on that date. They had one son John Foot born July 9 1660. See The Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury and Merrill's History of Amesbury. //P//
 Richard Currier1 of Salisbury and Amesbury Mass planter and millwright one of the original settlers of Salisbury his name appearing on a list of the inhabitants of the town at the time of its incorporation in 1640 was born in England or Scotland May 3 1616. He married first prior to 1643, Ann who died between April 5 1675 and October 26 1676 she having released her right of dower in a certain piece of property on July 8 1671. He married second October 26 1676 Joanna Pindor daughter of Henry Pindor and widow of Valentine Rowell and of William Sargent who died October 1690o aged about 69 years. He received land in Salisbury in 1641 and 1642 and in Salisbury new town now Amesbury in 1654, 1658, 1659, 1662, 1664, and 1668. February 16 1642 he sold to Abraham Morrill six house lots which were given to him by the town of Salisbury containing seven acres and January 20 1644 he bought Joseph Moyce's new house land and all things thereunto belonging. He was a commoner and was taxed in 1650. He was one ol the signers of the articles of agreement between the old and new town in 1654 and his name heads one list of the first commoners of Salisbury new town 1654-5. In 1652 he and Anthony Colby were given power to lay out a road four rods wide from ye mill bridge to ye plain that goeth to ye Lion's Mouth, and in 1655 he and William Barnes were chosen to take account of all staves due the town and examine them for the town and to give account to said company when they shall call for it, also to take account of ye saw mill which do saw for the use of the town. In 1656 he and Thomas Macy were authorized to build a saw mill on the west side of Powow river at the falls with the privilege of using all the timber on the common not included in the grant to the former mill excepting oak, and the right of the people to make canoes. For this privelege they were to pay the town six pounds per annum for ten years in boards at current prices. No logs were to be carried to the east side of the river to be sawed on penalty often shillings. They agreed to saw all the logs on shares as the following extract from the record shows. So the said Thomas Macy and Richard Currier do engage to saw what logs the townsmen bring to the mill for their own use to saw them to the halves within a month after they are brought to the mill if there be water the first logs that come to be first sawne and so the rest in order as they are brought. Thomas Macy sold his interest in the mill in 1658 and removed from town in 1659. That Richard Currier owned and operated it for many years is shown by the following deposition dated September 25 1682. The deposition of Richard Currier aged about sixty six years testifieth that I keep a saw mill at Amesbury near unto the saw mill that do belong to Salisbury upon the same river, and I have sawne this Spring about five or six thousand feet of boards a week for three months together and do swear that ye saw mill that do belong unto Salisbury is no ways inferior to the mill at Amesbury and has been as well improved and further say that the saw mills did sett about four months but had not a full head of water. At a town meeting held March 10 1660 he and John Hoyt Sr and Anthony Colby were chosen Prudential men to order all affairs given them in writing. He was acting clerk of Salisbury new town in 1660-1 and at the March meeting in 1662 was chosen to keep the the book of records and to record all meetings and to be allowed twelve pence for each meeting. He was also authorized to get a new record book the town to pay the cost. He held the office until December 14 1674 when he was succeeded by his son Deacon Thomas Currier. He was clerk of writs commissioner to try small cases and a selectman fifteen years. He last served as a selectman in 1682-3. It was however against his will and he declined to serve and was fined one shilling. Several others were chosen and declined but finally on being re chosen he consented to serve. In 1665 he was one of a committee of three to build the first meeting house in the new town and one of a committee of two to secure a minister. In the seating of the Amesbury meeting house 1667 his name stands first to set at the tabell but he was apparently a member of Salisbury church in 1677. May 14 1666 he was chosen to go to the General Court and present the petition of the new town for a separation from the old town of Salisbury. The petition was duly presented by him at a session of the General Court convened at Boston May 23 1666 and the prayer of the petitioners was granted early in the session. The name of the town was changed to Amesbury in 1667 and the change of name confirmed by the General Court May 27 1668 just and full bounds allowed to Amesbury May 12 1675 part of Salisbury called Little Salisbury annexed March 15 1844 part established as Merrimack. [April  1876 part of Salisbury annexed June 16 1886 to take effect July 1 1886] In 1661 he gave his son in law Captain Samuel Foot and his daughter Hannah Currier Foot the place he bought of George Martyn and in 1671 bought it back again by way of exchange giving him thirty acres at Cobler's brook as shown by the following extracts from the old Norfolk County records. Richard Currier of Salisbury planter for love to my son and daughter Samuel Foot and wife Hannah the dwelling house and land I bought of George Martyn in Salisbury new town bounded by ye street and John Hoyt Jr also ye landing place by Pawwaus river formerly said Martyn's. May 5 1661 Wit Sam Winsley Sr and Philip Challis Ack, in court at Hampton October 14 1662. Samuel Foot of Amesbury seaman conveyed to my father in law Richard Currier of Amesbury planter ye dwelling house and land given to me by my said father in Amesbury bounded by ye street John Hoyt Jr. Richard Currier and ye landing place by ye side of Pawwaus river formerly belonging to George Martyn 8 5 1671 Wit Thomas Bradbury and George Carre Jr. Ack by grantor and his wife Hannah released dower July 8 1671 before Robert Pike commissioner Richard Currier of Emsbery planter for house and land conveyed to Samuel Foot of Emsbery planter my 30 acre lot of upland in Emsbery bounded by Philip Challis, John Jimson, Cobler's brook and highway July 8 1671 Wit Thomas Bradbury and George Carre Jr. Ack by grantor tor his wife Ann releasing dower July 8 1671 before Robert Pike commissioner. His name appears frequently on the records of deeds he having owned a large amount of real estate during his life one deed of his conveying real estate was written in 1685 acknowledged the day of his death and not recorded until 1709. So thoroughly had he given away his property that there was no administration of his estate until about twenty five years after his death. His grandson Captain Richard Currier was appointed administrator November 6 1710 bond dated November 6 1710, inventory taken March 26 17n and inventory and account filed March 28 17n. Only one lot of land and his common right in Amesbury are entered. He was a soldier in the Narragansett war although nearly sixty years of age and his descendants drew land in Narragansett township No 1 now Buxton York County Maine on his original right as a Narragansett soldier. In February 1675 the constables of Marlboro Sudbury etc were to care for billeting the Plymouth forces passing through the towns and the constables of Lynn etc were to care for billeting the three Norfolk County soldiers John Dickison, Richard Currier and Thomas Mudgett for Abram Morrill until they came to Salisbury their home Massachusetts Archives. Richard Currier, John Weed Sr, and Samuel Foot trustees for the town of Amesbury sold to William Osgood Sr in 1683 4 house and land bought of John Hoyt Jr for the use of the ministry. He was evidently one of the most prominent men of Salisbury and Amesbury. See the Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury by David W Hoyt and Merrill's History of Amesbury. His last days were spent at the home of his wife's son Philip Rowell. He died February 22 1686 7 by drowning. He had at least two children Hannah and Thomas Currier and perhaps Samuel Currier of Haverhill Mass was his son or younger brother. The following is a copy of the inventory and account of administration of his estate taken from the original papers at the Probate Office in Salem Massachusetts. An inventory of the estate of Richard Currier late of Amesbury deceased taken by us the subscribers being sworn this twenty sixth day of March 1711. A lot of land in Amesbury in a place call The Threescore Acres about two acres Four pounds. His common right in Amesbury Ten shillings Total Four pounds Ten Shillings. John BlasdelI TI Appraisers. Thomas Hoyt Sworn per administration March 28 1712. Hannah Currier only daughter of Richard and Ann Currier was born in Salisbury Mass July 8 1643. She married June 23 1659 Captain Samuel Foot of Amesbury Mass planter who received land in Amesbury in 1659, 1660, 1662 and 1668. He was a townsman in 1660, had seat in meeting house in 1667 being one of the favored three who were seated at the tabell. He took the oath of allegiance in 1677 frequently served as moderator, held other local offices and was a representative to the General Court in 1689 and 1690. He was not a signer of the articles of agreement between the old and new town of Salisbury but took up his residence in the new town about 1658 when he was chosen one of a committee to lay out the river lots. He drew lot No 1 which lay along the western side of the Buttonwood road but cut off from the river by John Weed's ten acre lot. He lived at a place called Jamaca and it is very probable that his house was the garrison house several times spoken of in Merrill's History of Amesbury as Captain Foot's fort. He was taken by the Indians in the assault on Amesbury and tortured to death July 7 1690. She died after August 26 1708 she having witnessed her brother's will on that date. They had one son John Foot born July 9 1660. See The Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury and Merrill's History of Amesbury. 3 Deacon Thomas Currier son of Richard and Ann Currier of Amesbury Mass yeoman was born in Salisbury March 8 1646. He married December 9 1668 Mary Osgood daughter of William and Elizabeth Osgood of Salisbury who was born in Salisbury March 3 1649-50 and died at Amesbury November 2 1705 and from whom he inherited one fourth of the old saw mill in Salisbury which he bequeathed to his nine sons equal shares alike. He served the town of Amesbury in almost every capacity. He succeeded his father as town clerk December 14 1674 and transcribed the records in a neat hand until his death a period of nearly thirty eight years. He was a selectman seventeen years and held many other local offices and was also employed in settling estates and various other matters. He was a witness to the will of Edmund Eliott which his father wrote in 1675 and occasionally recorded meetings when his father was clerk as the records or portions of them prior to 1674 are in his handwriting. He probably lived near the mills and perhaps in the vicinity of the Lion's Mouth. He had twelve children nine sons and three daughters: Hannah, Thomas, Richard, Samuel, Mary, Anne, William, John, Joseph, Benjamin, Ebenezer and Daniel Currier. William Osgood in 1697 deeded to his daughter Mary then the wife of Thomas Currier one fourth of a saw mill in Salisbury the Old Saw mill so called on the Powow river near the corn mill. Deacon Thomas Currier died September 27 1712. His will dated August 26 17o8 was proved Nov 3 1712.-F

New England families, genealogical and memorial: a record of the ..., Volume 4: Richard Currier immigrant ancestor of the Curriers of New England was born in England or Scotland May 3 1616. He was one of the founders of Salisbury Massachusetts in 1640. He was granted land in Salisbury 1 11 1641-42 and in what is now the town of Amesbury in 1654, 58, 59, 62, 64, 68. He sold land February 16 1642 to Abraham Morrill and bought Joseph Moyce's house January 20 1644. He was a commoner and taxpayer in 1650. He was one of the signers of the articles of agreement between Salisbury and Amesbury, in 1654 and his name heads the list of first commoners of the new town in 1654-55. In 1652 he and Anthony Colby were appointed to lay out a highway from the mill bridge to the plain that goeth to the Lion's Mouth. He served on various other town committees. In 1656 he and Thomas Macy were empowered to build a saw mill on the west side of the Powow river. Macy sold his interests in 1658 and Currier operated the mill for many years. He was elected on the prudential committee March 10 1660. He was acting clerk of Amesbury 1660 61 and town clerk in 1662 serving until December 14 1674 when he was succeeded by his son Thomas. He was also clerk of writs commissioner to hear small causes and selectman for fifteen years. When he declined to serve further as selectman he was fined. He was on the committee of three to build the meeting house in 1665 and on the committee of two to secure a minister. In seating the meeting house at Amesbury 1667 his name has the place of honor. He was elected to present a petition to the general court May 14 1666 asking for separation of Amesbury and Salisbury and was successful in his mission.The name was changed to Amesbury in 1667 and the change confirmed by the general court May 27 1668. He was a planter and millwright as described in various documents. He deeded his real estate to his heirs before his death excepting one lot of land and his rights as commoner in Amesbury. Twenty five years after he died his grandson Richard Currier was appointed administrator November 6 1710. He was a soldier in King Philip's war and his descendants were granted land in what is now Buxton Maine in payment of his service. His last days were spent in the family of his wife's son Philip Rowell. He died February 22 1686 87 by drowning. He married first Ann second October 26 1676 Joanna Pindar widow of Valentine Pindar and of William Sargent daughter of Henry Pindar. Children by first wife Samuel, Hannah born July 8 1643, Thomas of whom further.

History of Amesbury: Including the First Seventeen Years of Salisbury: In 1661 Richard Currier gave his son-in-law, Samuel Foot, and wife Hannah (daughter of Richard) the place of George Martin, and this year he bought it back by way of exchange, giving him thirty acres at Cobler's brook.

Founders and Patriots of America Index: Currier, Richard (May 3, 1616-Feb 22, 1686/7) m. a. 1643 Ann ...... MASS XVIII, 12; XXV, 110; XXXI, 48, 69, 211.

An octagon for the Curriers, pub 1995: Henry Currier - Thomas Currier m Martha Osborne 1570 - 1627. They had Thomas b 1613-14, Richard b 1616-17, Margaret b 1619

Wiltshire Parish Register: Thomas Currier and  Martha Osborne 1/14/1610-1

White Swirled Line

Return to: | Home Page | | Smith/Glidden Surnames |  | Davis/McDowell Surnames |
Visit also: Calais Memorial High School, Calais, Maine, Alumni

Search this site or the web powered by FreeFind

Site search Web search

Prepared by Karen E. Smith Howell - comments, suggestions, and corrections are welcome.
Copyright 1997 - 2013  Oak Bay Designs. All rights reserved. Revised: October 30, 2017 .