Barber

Barber, Barbers, Barbour, Berber

John BARBER, The Loyalist, of New York either a mechanic or carpenter or both with the Engineers as noted in Isabella's pension request and in the Carleton Papers (on a list at Horn's Hook, August 1781), grantee of Port Matoon Association  and an Armed Boatman dispatch boat Miranda,  died 2/12/1836 in St. James Parish, New Brunswick.  born 1753; buried in Loyalist Cemetery St. Stephen NB; on tax rolls in St. Stephen 1815. The Port Matoon Assoc. was first in NS then in St. Andrews NB.

Spouse: Isabella Elizabeth __ applied for a pension as a widow of Rev. War Loyalist after John died, received it until she died in 1842. In her 1840 disposition as a widow of man who served in the Revolutionary War in America, she stated her age was 86 and that she and John Barber had been married in Elizabethtown, NY in 1780. Born circa 1754. She signed with a mark. Documents online in NB Archives.

Children: Mary born 9/18/1784 died 1855; Nancy born 12/25/1787 died 4/18/1842 Lynnfield NB married Joseph Trafton 11/20/1804; John Jr. born 1795 married Mary Cook 1816 daughter of Isaac Cook and Susannah Dusten; Elisabeth born 1794 NB married William Maxwell 1814; SarahDuncan McCollison born 12/13/1800 died 1844 St. John NB, married Hannah Clendenning [Barber information per Tom Moffatt tmoffatt@nbnet.nb.ca & Mike McGarry.]

 

Mary BARBER, resided Oak Hill NB, born 9/18/1784, died 7/8/1855 ME

Spouse: William CROCKETT born 1/10/1782 NH married 3/11/1804

Children: Rebecca Chatman born 8/5/1807 Calais ME married Joseph Davis; Ann born 6/16/1805 Calais married ? Grant; Almira Catherine born 3/23/1810 Calais married Ephraim Hadley Stevens; Mary Isabella born 5/25/1812 Calais, died 3/7/1896 age 82 yrs 10 mo of Indocarditis married Jacob Stevens; Harriet born 1/9/1816 Calais or Alexander married Barzellia Mosher Babcock; William Harrison born 11/26/1821 Alexander married (1) Mary Ann Flanders m 1847 (2) Hity Ann Esty m 1855 (3) Susan Cole m 1864; Cordelia born 1/25/1824 Alexander married Sylvanus Henry Seavey


Ward Chipman Papers, Muster Master General's Office, Loyalist Musters `1776-1785: Roll of men, women and children settled near the fall of Scoodiac River in the town of St. Andrews Passamaquoddy under the direction of Capt. Nehemiah Marks 11 June 1784: Men - John Barber Women: Isabel Barber Child Under 10: Mary Barber.

Glimpses of the Past, St. Croix Courier 9/9/1893: Members of Miranda's Crew: John Wall, Josiah Fowler, James Farren, Joseph Betson, James Waller, Chas. Darby, John Corvan, Peter Eldred, John Barber, James Lawrie.

[Any connection?]George Washington Papers 10/18/1775. Names of Officers, Non-Commissioned Officer & Private Men brought prisoners from Chamble, Canada: John Barber.  Albany NY 10/18/1777 Return of Prisoners of War in town this day: John Barber Serjt Artillery.

William Crockett & Mary Barber information per Grace Meader from Early Families of Alexander A-CHS # 64, 65 & 66. John Barber was a Loyalist. References in "Loyalists to Canada" by Ted Holmes. Page 155 St. Andrews Grantees: John Barber. Page 160 St. Andrews grantees were also grantees of the Port Matoon/Mouton Association (now St. Stephen NB): John Barber. Page 162/3: He was a grantee of St. Andrews and a grantee with the Port Matoon/Mouton Association. He was a Mariner and served in Captain Nehemiah Marks' Company of Armed Boatmen. He was a member of the crew of the dispatch boat "Miranda," used by Captain Marks in claiming lands. John Barber settled along the "Old Ridge Road" near Morristown (St. Stephen NB). His name is recorded in a 1790-1 account book for the Porter family store at Ferry's Point (Calais ME).

Loyalists to Canada: pg 153; The date of he Loyalist grant, to "William Gammon and 429 others," on the town plot of St. Andrews [N.B.], was August 12, 1784. Individuals and families who were granted town lots were mostly Loyalist refugees, officers and men of the 74th Regiment, and Argyll Highlanders who had been stationed at Fort George.  There were others from the 64th, 70th, 84th, N.C. Highlanders, Royal Garrison Battalion, and King's Orange Rangers.   /P/ The plan for the town of St. Andrews consisted of six parallel streets running from northwest to southeast, and thirteen streets crossing them at right angles, forming sixty square blocks, etc. Each block was divided into eight lots.  Three divisions -- Bulkley, Parr, and Morris -- were planned for the settlement, and the streets were to be broad and regular.  Grantees were required to build their houses six feet from the street line.  This early planning resulted in a beautiful seaside town, which is noticeably attractive even today (1992). pg 155; The names of the St. Andrews grantees were: ... Barber, John ...Henderson, Hugh ... Hitchings, Amos ...Lillie/Lyall, John ... pg 160; The following St. Andrews grantees were also grantees of the Port Matoon/Mouton Association (now St. Stephen, New Brunswick): ... Barber, John ... Lillie/Lyall, John ... pg 161 The following St. Andrews grantees were also grantees with the Cape Ann Association in St. David Parish: ... Hitchings, Josiah, Jr. ...  Among the following St. Andrews grantees, are included part of the 74th Regiment, Argyll Highlanders ... Henderson, Hugh ..

Loyalists to  Canada, pg 162: Barber, John. He was a grantee at St. Andrews, and a grantee with the Port Matoon (Mouton) Association.  He was a mariner, and served in Captain Nehemiah Marks' company of Armed Boatmen. He was a member of the crew of the dispatch boat Miranda, used by Captain Marks in claiming lands. John Barber settled along the "Old Ridge Road" near Morristown (St. Stephen, New Brunswick). His name is recorded in a 1790-91 account book for the Porter family store at Ferry's Point (Calais, Maine). pg 191; 107 lots at Morristown (St. Stephen, N.B.), at the head of tide on the Schoodic (St. Croix River), were granted to "John Dunbar and associates." 54 of the lots, except for lot #42, in the western division of the grant, were known as the marks Division. The 53 lots in the eastern division were known as the Jones Division.  pg 193; Grantees with the Port Matoon Association, in the Jones Division, were: Barber, John

Loyalists of New Brunswick by Wright: Some 18 miles up the St. Croix River, at the fishing falls, the Port Matoon Association laid out another townsite. This group composed largely of men employed in the Civil Departments of the army and of Armed Boatmen, had been sent from new York late in Nov. to Port Mouton, Nova Scotia. In Feb. 1784 Gov. Parr reported the only people not pleased were the Commissary General's Dept. Nehemiah Marks formerly of Derby, Conn., who had served with the Armed Boatmen, surveyed possible alternatives, and eventually selected the Schoodic or St. Croix River as the desirable site. Several boatmen, employees of the Ordnance, the Barrack Master Generals, and the Commissary Generals Dept. joined him. The 1784 census noted there were 201 Loyalists with Marks at the fishing falls. When they were laying out the townsite at St. Stephen, they were supposed to have interfered with the garden of one of the squatters who protested that his beans would be ruined. Nehemiah Marks is said to have answered that the King was a gentleman and would pay him for his beans. A-CHS 3/19/85

Muster Roll of Captain Nathan Hubbill's Company of armed boatmen. Ward Chipman Papers MG 23 D1, Series 1, volume 27, page 375. John Barber, 1782, Armed Boatmen Muster Roll of Captain Nathan Hubbill's Company of armed boatmen. Ward Chipman Papers MG 23 D1, Series 1, volume 27, page 380. John Barber 1782 Roll of Men, Women and Children settled near the Falls of Scoodiac River in the Town of St. Andrews Passamaquoddy under the directon of Captain Nehemiah Marks.
Ward Chipman Papers MG 23 D1, Series 1, volume 24, page 166. John Barber, 1784, St. Andrews
Roll of Men, Women and Children settled near the Falls of Scoodiac River in the town of St. Andrews Passamaquoddy under the direction of Captain Nehemiah Marks. Ward Chipman Papers, MG 23 D1, Series 1, volume 24, page 167. Isabel Barber, 1784, St. Andrews. Mary Barber, 1784, St. Andrews, Child. 
Muster Roll of Captain Thomas Hamilton's company in the Royal North Carolina Regiment, Ward Chipman Papers, MG 23 D1, Series 1, volume 26, page 236. John Jacob Barber, 1783, Royal North Carolina Regiment. 

American Loyalist Troops 1775-84.  Amhurst's Corps -- See under West Indies.  Armed Boatmen Company raised from July 1781 under Capt. William Luce and, in 1783, Nathan Hubbill; served in New  York and on lower Hudson River; skirmish at Tom's River NJ, March 1782; disbanned circa September 1783.

Saint Croix Courier, St. Stephen, NB November 9, 1893 GLIMPSES OF THE PAST Contributions to the History of Charlotte County and the Border Towns. XC – THE PORT MATOON ASSOCIATION-Continued. Others of the Miranda’s crew who came here, so far as their names can be recalled at present, were John Wall, Josiah Fowler, James Farren, Joseph Betson, James Wallar, Chas. Darby, John Corvan, Peter Eldred, John Barber, and James Lawrie.

St Stephen Tax List - 1815 (Transcribed from a xerox copy in the MC files at PANB). To Robinson [Crocker?] Collector of Taxes in the Parish of St Stephen. You are hereby Requested & Directed forthwith to call on the following Persons for their Respective Rates as hereunto annexed to their number, and, You will pay the amount thereof, being Forty Two Pounds Ten Shillings into the hand of the Treasurary of the County for the purpose Directed by Law. Signd. Robert Wattson, William Kennady, William Maybe. ....Robert Hitchins ... Josiah Hitchins ... John Barber ... David Hitchins ... Benj. Henderson

From Library and Archives Canada, Ward Chipman Papers, Muster Master General's Office - Loyalists Musters, 1776-1785 (M.G. 23, D 1, Series I, Volume 24, pages 166-168) Microfilm C-9818 Roll of Men, Women and Children settled near the Falls of Scoodiac River in the Town of St Andrews Passamaquoddy, under the Direction of Capt. Nehemiah Marks 11 June 1784 - John Barber, Isabel Barber, Mary Barber child under 10.

??Proceedings of a Board of general officers of the British army at New York, 1781:  New York 26th August 1781 Muster Roll of Artificers Sawyers & employed at the undermentioned places under the direction & orders of Captain Alexander Mercer Commanding Engineer. Where Employed - Horns Hook. Station - Carpenters. Names - John Barber.
??Luther M. Barber of Calais married Mary Fuller of Calais 10/15/1844. Matilda Barber of Calais married William A. Quincy of Calais 5/13/1843. Nancy Barber of Machiasport married Stilman Holmes of Machiasport 12/13/1834

St. Croix Courier 1893: James Wall, mariner, one of Capt. Marks’s company in the corps of Armed Boatmen, and a member of the crew of his dispatch boat, the Miranda, also gave Capt. Marks authority to claim his lands. Others of the Miranda’s crew who came here, so far as their names can be recalled at present, were John Wall, Josiah Fowler, James Farren,4 Joseph Betson, James Wallar, Chas. Darby, John Corvan, Peter Eldred, John Barber, and James Lawrie.

The On-Line Institute for Advanced Loyalist Studies: Armed Boat Company Warrant to Luce. To Wiliam LUCE Esqr. "By Virtue of the Power and Authority in me vested, I do hereby Authorize & empower you to raide for his Majesty's Service. One Company of Able Bodied Men, to be employed in Whale Boats & other Armed Vessels, to consist of One Capt., four Lieuts., Eight Mates & Ninety two Private Men who will engage to serve in the above mentioned Capacity for two years, or, if required, during the Continuance of the present Rebellion in North America, to receive the same Pay as the Marines employed in the Armed Vessels in the Qr. Masr. Genis. Depart. to be Cloathed, Armed & be under the same Regulation & Discipline as his Majesty's Provincial Forces. /P/ The Officers to be appointed by me; & it is to be made known to the Lieuts. that, upon each of them producing Twenty five Men, they will be entitled to their Pay & Commission. All Officers Civil & Military & Others his Majesty's Legal Subjects are hereby required to be Aiding & Assisting to you & all concerned in the Execution of the Above Services, for which this shall be to you & tem a Sufficient Warrant & Authority. /P/ Given under my Hand & Seal at Head Quarters New York the 2nd Day of July 1781. H. CLINTON. I do Certify that the Above is a true Copy of a Warrant in my possession. Charles COOKE"

[There is a John Barber buried in the Old Loyalist Burial Ground, St. Stephen died 1843 age 40.

Elizabeth BARBER age 89 - Year of Reliev 1840 Charlotte Co. Pensions Old Revolutionary Soldiers and Widows Chargeable on the Relief Fund 1843

??JOHN BARBER, RWPA #S29613. He served in Captain William Jackson's Company of the Fourth New York Regiment [Colonel Francis Nichol’s Regiment

Saint Croix Courier, St. Stephen, NB. October 5, 1893. GLIMPSES OF THE PAST. Contributions to the History of Charlotte County and the Border Towns. LXXXV – MORRISTOWN. While the St. Andrews Loyalists were waiting for their grants, another companyof Loyalists and disbanded soldiers arrived and encamped in the wilderness on the banks of the Schoodic. There was much dissatisfaction at Shelburne, it will be remembered,1in the spring of 1784.  At Port Matoon, near Shelburne, the same feeling prevailed; and a ‘camp election’ was held, at which a number of those who hoped to better their condition voted to come to Quoddy with Capt. Marks. On the 26th of May, 1784, their vessel arrived and cast anchor opposite where the town of St. Stephen now stands.  They landed, put up the British flag, and called the place Morristown. Capt. Nehemiah Marks, the leader of this colony, was born at Derby, Conn.  Soon after the war commenced, he joined the British at New York.  He was commissioned by Sir Guy Carleton in 1782, as captain of a company in the corps of Armed Boatmen.  He afterwards held a commission as lieutenant in the King’s Own Maryland Loyalists.  He was a grantee of St. Andrews as well as of St. Stephen, and one of the first justices of the peace for Charlotte.  He was also a member of the first vestry, or church corporation; and was present (and sworn in, according to the custom of the times,) at its second meeting in St. Andrews, in August, 1786.  He died at Saint Stephen, on the 12th of July, 1799, at the age of fifty two. When Capt. Marks and his colonists arrived, they found several persons2settled on the spot, without any other claim to their lands than that of occupation.  Generally in such cases the ‘old inhabitants’ were dispossessed, the Loyalist grantees paying the appraised value of their improvements; but the pioneers of Schoodic were more liberally dealt with, and such as were willing to take the oath of allegiance were allowed to remain and received grants of land. The Loyalists landed near the house of Robinson Crocker, which stood where Miss Atherton’s house now stands, and encamped along the river bank.  St. Stephens bank building now occupies a portion of the site of this first encampment that was then a small field in which Eben Libby had sown peas.  He very naturally objected to their proceedings, especially to the destruction of his field of peas; but Capt. Marks told him ‘the king was a gentleman and would pay all damages,’ so the new comers were hospitably treated. They had not long to wait for their grants. The ‘garden lots,’ lying along both sides of what we now call King street, from the public landing to the present northern boundary of the town, were granted to ‘John Dunbar and associates,’ 103 in number, on the 16th of September following; together with a separate tract to Capt. Marks, of 100 acres lying west of the garden lots, through which runs the Marks street of to-day.  By a further grant they received farm lots north of the town; and many of the farms along the Old Ridge road are still held by their descendants. In a separate grant to ‘Nehemiah Marks and associates’ was included all the rest of the land within the present town limits from Dennis stream to the cove. The first deed on record at St. Andrews conveys one of the farm lots above mentioned, and reads as follows:  This Indenture made this thirteenth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four.  Between John McGrier of the County of Sunbury and province of New Brunswick of the one part and James Reyen of the county and province aforesaid of the other part.  Witnesseth that the said John McGrier in Consideration of the sum of Five pounds Halifax Currency to him well and truly in hand paid by him the said James Rayen Have granted bargained sold and aliened and confirmed unto the said James Rayen his Heirs and Assigns All that Messuage or Tenement situate on Schudock River in the port Matoon Association, containing by Estimate of Survey Fifty Acres and Nob’d No. 4 and lettered Letter A, with all Houses, Buildings Gardens, Orchards, Woods, Ways, Waters, Easements and Advantages to the said Messuage or Tenement with all and every Appurtenances thereunto belonging unto the said James Ryan his Heirs and Assigns for ever to hold without Lett hindrance Trouble or Molestation by me me or any person or deriveing under me.  Given under my hand and Seal the day and year first above written.JOH McGEAR. Signed and sealed and delivered in the Presence of  JOHN COLVILL. ANDREW MARTIN. A deed given by ‘Noah Brown, Inhabitant of St. Stephens,’ in January, 1788, to ‘Nehemiah Marks, Esqr., Inhabitant of St. Stephen,’3 conveys ‘my Town Lot in Moriston, Number fifty three on the Left, Drawn by me as a Loyalist, together with a Log house there on;’ and one in the following year, (with many curious misspellings,) transfers from Alexander Gordon to ‘Nimiah Marks, Esqr.’, ‘all my Right, Title and Interest in and Claim to that moiety of Land Known by No. 36 on the Left in the Town of Morris Town.’ Soon after this the name of Morristown  appears to have been dropped.

There can be little doubt that Nehemiah Marks and his company were amongst those associated in the enterprise referred to in the following extract from a New York newspaper of the time: 

Such persons discharged from the several Departments of the Army and Navy as have agreed to form a joint Settlement at Port Matoon in Nova Scotia, and are desirous of proceeding there immediately, are requested to give in without loss of time, a Return of themselves and families to the heads of their respective departments, in order that a proper vessel may be obtained for the purpose of conveying them and their baggage.  They will hold themselves in readiness to embark in eight days from the date hereof. Loyalists and discharged soldiers who have been admitted to join this settlement are required to give in their names, if desirous of going at present, to Mr. Hugh’s next door to the Bull’s Head, in the Bowery. By order of the Managers.  BILL WARD, Secretary. New York, Oct. 11th, 1783.

Annals of Calais ME & St. Stephen NB: In 1790-1 the following names were found in Mr. Porter's account book: ...John Barber...

Armed Boatmen: Nehemiah Marks was born in Derby, Connecticut, on 9 October 1746. He was the son of Mordecai Marks (1706-1771), a Shepardic Jew who emigrated from London, England, in 1721 and became a prosperous merchant. He converted to the Anglican faith and in 1729 married Elizabeth [Hawkins] of Derby, Connecticut. Soon after the Revolution began, Nehemiah Marks went to New York where it is believed he carried despatches for the British army. He served as a captain in the Armed Boatmen, a Loyalist corps, with a commission dated 5 October 1782. His commission as a lieutenant in the Maryland Loyalists, dated 1 October 1783, can be found among the papers of his son, Nehemiah Marks, Jr. With the evacuation of New York City, Nehemiah Marks, Sr. was forced to seek refuge in Nova Scotia, and on 1 November 1783, he was appointed a captain in the Nova Scotia Militia for the District of Port Mouton, and charged with the responsibility of settling his men and their families. The refugees remained at Port Mouton for the winter of 1783, but in 1784 Captain Marks decided to move to the Falls of the St. Croix River (St. Stephen, New Brunswick), and a number of his men chose to accompany him.

Historical Collection of the State of New Jersey:  In the American revolution, a rude fort or blockhouse was erected a short distance N. of the bridge, at the village of Toms River, on a hill about a hundred yards E. of the road to Freehold, on land now belonging to the heirs of Elijah Robins, deceased.  In the latter part of the war this blockhouse was attacked by a superior force of the enemy.  Its commander, Capt. Huddy, most gallantly defended it until his ammunition was expended, and no alternative but surrender left.  After the little brave garrison was in their power, it is said they deliberately murdered five men asking for quarters.  From thence Capt. Huddy, Justice Randolph, and the remaining prisoners, were taken to New York, when, suffering the various progressions of barbarity inflicted upon those destined toa violent or lingering death, those two gentlemen, with a Mr. Fleming, were put into the hold of a vessel.  Capt. Huddy was ironed hand and foot, and shortly after barbarously hanged on the shore at the Highlands of Navisink.  Annexed is the British account of this expedition, taken from Rivington's Royal Gazette.  "The authentic account of the expedition against the rebel post on Toms river, New Jersey, under the Honorable Board of Associated Loyalists:  On Wednesday the 20th inst., [March, 1782,] Lieut. Blanchard, of the armed wwhaleboats, and about eighty men belonging to them, with Capt. Thomas and Lieut. Roberts, both of the late Bucks county volunteers, and between thirty and forty other refugee loyalists, the whole unde rthe command of Lieut. Blanchard, proceeded to Sandy Hook, under convoy of Capt. Stewart Ross, inn the armed brig Arrogant, where they were detained by unfavorable winds until the 23d.  About 12 o'clock on that night, the party landed near the mouth of Toms river, and marched to the blockhouse at the town of Dover, [now Toms River,] and reached it just at daylight.  On their way they were challenged and fired upon, and when they came to the works they found the rebels, consisting of twenty-five or twenty-six twelve months men and militis, apprized of their coming, and prepared for defense.  The post into which they had thrown themselves was about six or seven feet high, made with large logs with loop-holes beetween, and a number of brass swivels on the top, which was entirely open, nor was there any way of entering but by climbing over.  They had, besides swivels, muskets with bayonets, and long pikes for their defense. Lieut. Blanchard summoned them to surrenderr, which they not only refused, but bid the party defiance: on which he immediately ordered the place to be stormed, which was accordingly done, and though defended with obstinacy, was soon carried.  The rebels had nine men killed in the assault, and twelve made prisoners, two of whom are wounded.  The rest made their escape in the confusion.  Among the killed was a major of the militia, two captains, and one lieutenant.  The ccaptain of the twwelve months men stationed there, is amongst the prisoners, who are all brought safe to town.  On our side, two were killed---Lieut. Iredel, of the armed boatmen,  and Lieut. Inslee, of the loyalists, both very brave officers, who distinguished themselves on the attack, and whose loss in much lamented.  Lieut. Roberts and five others are wounded, but it is thought none of them are in a dangerous way.  The Town, as it is called, consisting of about a dozen houses, in which none but a piratical set of B=banditti resided, together with a grist and saw mill, were with the blockhouse burned to the ground, and an inon cannon spiked and thrown into the river.  A fine large barge, (called Hyler's barge,) and another boat in which the rebels used to make their excursions on the coast, were brought off.  Some other attempts were intended to have been made, but the appearance of bad weather, and the situation of the wounded, being without either surgeon or medicines, induced the party to return to New York, where they arrived on the twenty-fifth."

Moving on: Black Loyalists in the Afro Atlantic World:  At least several blacks served in a unique corps called the Armed Boat Company. This unit, commanded by Captain William Luce and later by Nathan Hubbell, was raised to serve in armed whaleboats and other small craft to counteract Rebel whaleboats raiding Long Island and other British garrisons. While this unit was technically a provincial regiment, black boatmen were apparently not disqualified from service.  These men were armed, and the whole corps, about 80 men, took part in two of the last actions of the war in the North. On Jan 8, 1782, they joined about 300 British regulars in attacking rebel whaleboats at New Brunswick, NJ.  The second attack, on Mar 23, 1782, was much bloodier and set the stage for one last brutality in the war.  The Armed Boat Company, joined by 40 Associated Loyaists (which also enlisted blacks), attacked a blockhouse at Tom's River, NJ.  Several were killed and wounded on each side, but the blockhouse was taken and the bulk of the Rebel garrison was captured.  The garrison included a certain captain by the name of `Joshua Huddy.  Exactly a week later, 6 Associated Loyalists under the command of Captain Clayton Tilton, including "Negro Moses," were captured in a skirmish on the Jersey Shore of Monmouth County.  One of the Associates, Philip White, was either murdered or cuct down attempting to escape. This act infuriated the Loyalists, particularly Captain Richard Lippencott, an Associator.  On April 8, he was given Captain Joshua Huddy of the Tom's River blockhouse to exchange for Captain Tilton.  Lippencott took justice into his own hands and executed Huddy on the Jersey Shore. The event would lead to threats of retaliation by George Washington himself. The involvement of the British commander in chief, Sir Guy Carleton, hastened an end to hostilities and the disbanding of the Associated Loyalists.

Advanced Loyalist Studies: Armed Boat Company. Warrant to Luce. To William LUCE Esqr..By Virtue of the Power & Authority in me vested, I do hereby Authorize & empower you to raise for his Majesty's Service, One Company of Able Bodied Men, to be employed in Whale Boats & other Armed Vessels, to consist of One Capt., four Lieuts., Eight Mates & Ninety two Private Men who will engage to serve in the above mentioned Capacity for two years, or, if required, during the Continuance of the present Rebellion in North America, to receive the same Pay as the Marines employed in the Armed Vessels in the Qr. Masr. Genls. Depart. to be Cloathed, Armed & be under the same Regulation & Discipline as his Majesty's ProvincialThe Officers to be appointed by me; & it is to be made known to the Lieuts. that, upon each of them producing Twenty five Men, they will be entitled to their Pay & Commission. All Officers Civil & Military & Others his Majesty's Legal Subjects are hereby required to be Aiding & Assisting to you & all concerned in the Execution of the Above Services, for which this shall be to you & them a Sufficient Warrant & Authority. Given under my Hand & Seal at Head Quarters New York the 2nd Day of July 1781.I do Certify that the Above is a true Copy of a Warrant in my possession.   Charles COOKE  Great Britain, Public Record Office, Treasury Office, Class 1, Volume 647, folio 74.

Loyalists to Canada - The1783 Settlement of Quakers and Others at Passamaquoddy: pg. 155: An 1803 Statement of the Population of St. Andrews Parish recorded 104 men, 106 women, and 277 children, for a total population of 487. The account reported: "Since the year 1785 there has been built in the Parish about 42 sail of square rigged vessels, besides small Craft. Tonnage 9,040 tons. There are 4 single Saw Mills in the Parish which cut annually about 400,000 feet of Boards." The names of the St. Andrews grantees were: Barber, John.; Greenlow/Greenlaw, Alexander; Greenlow/Greenlaw, Ebenezer; Greenlow/Greenlaw, Jonathan; Henderson, Hugh; Lillie/Lyall, John;  pg 160: The following St. Andrews grantees were also grantees of the Port Matoon/Mouton Association (now St. Stephen, New Brunswick.): Barber, John; Lillie/Lyall, John. pg 161 The following St. Andrews grantees were also grantees with the Cape Ann Association in St. David Parish: Hitchings, Josiah, Jr. Pg 162: Barber, John. He was a grantee of St. Andrews, and a grantee with the Port Matoon (Mouton) Association. He was a mariner, and served in Captain Nehemiah Marks' company of Armed Boatmen. He was a member of the crew of the dispatch boat Miranda, used by Captain Marks in claiming lands. John Barber settled along the "Old Ridge Road" near Morristown (St. Stephen, NB). His name is recorded in a 1790-91 account book for the Porter family store at Ferry's Point (Calais, Maine).Pg. 193: Grantees with the Port Matoon Association, in the Jones Division, were: Barber, John

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