Pearce

Pearce, Pierce, Peirce, Pearse, Pairce, Pears

John PIERCE of London, clothworker, never came to America per Johnson, died 8/19/1661 Watertown

Spouse: Elizabeth ___

Children: Richard

 

Richard PIERCE, carpenter, of Muscongus 1625, bought land at Round Pond and Pemaquid river. 1/9/1641 of Samoset,

Spouse: Elizabeth BROWN married by 1647

Children: Richard born circa 1647; John born 1652; William; Francis married Lydia; George born 1666 married Rebecca; Elizabeth married Richard Fulford/Fullford/Fulworth; Margaret married Nathaniel Ward; Joseph ; Mary married Nathaniel Hamlin; Sarah married Eleaser Stockwell

 

Richard PIERCE born circa 1647, died by 1734, coaster/fisherman, of Marblehead MA as early as 1718, family removed to Marblehead as a result of King Philip's War

Spouse: Mary ?

Children: Richard born circa 1690 married Hannah Basset 7/22/1713; John born circa 1696; Robert married Mary Merritt; Joseph ; Thomas; Benjamin; Mary married Edward Surriage had daughter Agnes who became ward of Sir Charles Frankland; Hannah married Joseph Morse 

 

John PEARCE I, baker, born circa 1696, died 1784

Spouse: Elizabeth MERRETT or MERRITT married 11/30/1715 Marblehead [MA VR]; had other wives per M&NH

Children:  John baptized 1/6/1717; Elizabeth twin baptized 8/16/1719; Mary twin baptized 8/16/1719; Sarah baptized 7/9/1721; John II baptized 1/19/1724 married Elizabeth Dixey; Rebecca baptized 2/6/1726; Rebecca baptized 1727; Jane twin baptized 2/23/1729; Mehitable twin baptized 2/23/1729; Jean baptized 1/17/1730-1; Anna baptized 1/7/1733; Ruhamah baptized 1/19/1735; Martha twin baptized 1/1/1738; Ruhamah twin baptized 1/1/1738; Nathaniel baptized 9/23/1739

 

John PEARCE II born Marblehead MA baptized 1/19/1724

Spouse: Elizabeth DIXEY born circa 1725, married 8/19/1746 Marblehead (MA VR)

Children: John bp 5/24/1747 Marblehead; John baptized 11/20/1748; Robert born 1/27/1751 died 6/26/1840; Joseph bp 2/17/1754; Richard Christened 11/9/1755; all Marblehead

 

John PEARCE III bp 11/20/1748 or 5/24/1747 Marblehead MA, married 12/26/1771; died 3/9/1828 [MA Deaths[; Revolutionary Vet, Master's Mate on Frigate "Boston" & "Thorne"; [Dau. of American Revolution]

Spouse: Elizabeth ROGERS Dolibar, widow of (1) John Dolibar intentions 6/2/1768; married (2) married 12/26/1771 to Pearce Marblehead (MA VR do not list her as Widow Dolibar)

Children: Elizabeth bp 9/20/1772 Marblehead; John baptized 2/26/1775; Samuel Rogers bp 1/3/1779 Marblehead; Lydia bp 11/12/1780 Marblehead; John bp 1/27/1782 Marblehead; Lydia2 bp 1/18/1784 Marblehead; Lucy W.  bp 9/5/1790 Marblehead;   

 

Lucy  PEARCE of Penobscot, bp 9/5/1790 Marblehead, died 2/12/1860 Cooper Washington ME

Spouse: John Hancock SMITH born 11/15/1786 Orland ME; died 5/25/1870 Edmunds ME; married 6/26/1808 Orland ME

Children: Children: Haskell Wood born 8/11/1809; Rogers Pearse born 8/1/1816 [of Hamlin KS per A-CHS]; Francis Warren born 4/17/1811 married Eleanor Averill, (2) Elizabeth Munson, (3) Mrs. Mary Andrews; George Washington born 2/16/ 1813 Bucksport married Mary A. Smith of NB 10/30/1838 Washington Co. [ME Marriages]; Rhoda H. born 1815 married Girdon Palmeter joined D.A.R. in Concord MA 1896; John Hancock born c. 1819; Ezra Whitman born 1/6/1821 Eastport


Census 1820 Marblehead Essex MA: John Pearce 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Census 1820 Marblehead Essex MA: John Pearce Jr. 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

A History Of The Towns Of Bristol And Bremen In The State of Maine: Richard Pearce (Pearse Peirce) son of John Peirce of London Eng came early to this place perhaps at the same time with John Brown whose daughter Elizabeth he married. It has been conjectured that the marriage was at least contracted before they came to this country but it is only conjecture.

Gen Dictionary ME & NH pg 554: Richard Pierce, carpenter, Muscongus m Elizabeth Brown(15); unkn where and when they d. List 121. In 1729 desc had recorded an Ind deed to him from John Summersett 9 Jan 1641 land betw Round Pond and Pemaquid Point. Four of eight heirs signed an agreement in 1717. Ch Richard eldest s b +-1647; John b +-1652; William; Francis had w Lydia and d by 1729 called of Manchester, decd in 1734, also late of Beverly. Only surv ch Elizabeth b Mar 22. Apr 1700 m 1718 Edw Clark of Gloucester; George ag 55 in Feb 1720-1 liv Beverly 1734 where one George d in 1746. W. Rebecca. Ch rec Bev 1701-1716: Abigail, Rebecca, William, George, Elizabeth, Mary. Elizabeth m Richard Fulford. Margaret d in Suffield Ct 28 Dec 1688 m 1st one Long (dau Elizabeth m in Milton 1710 Simes Langley later of Norwich Ct) m 2d in Dorchester 18 Nov 1681 Thos Pope (ch Elizabeth m in Plymouth 1706 Nathan Ward; Mindwell m Wm Huxley of Suffield). Mary m in Marblehead 10 Apr 1695 Nathl Hamilton (Hamblin by deeds), both of Manchester, Suffield 1732. See York D. for numerous deeds and depos by ch and gr ch; Doc Hist 9:451; Gen Advertiser 1:95; Col Soc MA 6:21; 8:104.
* *  pg554: Richard Pierce, coaster, fisherman, Marblehead. Lists 15, 189. His w was Mary, see also Ewen. (One R.P and w Mary of Manchester 1692 were gr ch of Richard Woodis; see (5) and Suff D 44:165). In 1744 his s Richard depos that his parents liv at Smelt Cove except during Ind wars and he often visited them. The fa was of Marbleh 1717, ag 70; Muscongus 1718-1721 and s John depos that he went there ab 1722 and brot his fa and fam away. Marbleh 1729; d by 1734. Ch order unk: 1st 5 bp at Marbleh 27 Oct 1700: Richard 30 in 1720 m 22 Sep 1713 Hannah Basset, Marbleh 1734, Muscongus 1737, and mtg the ho he had built at Smelt Cove, in 1744 +-52 he depos he knew the ind language and had been ab 27 yrs a trader with them at the East. Dea John, baker, Marbleh m 30 Nov 1715 Elizabeth Merritt and had later wives. Ag +-70 in 1764, +-76 in 1770, d 1784. Robert m 10 Dec 1717 Mary Merritt; Joseph; Thomas; Benjamin; Mary m Edward Surriage; Hannah w of Joseph Morse who is a difficulty. In 1719 Wm deeded 100 a at Muscongus to neph J.M. of Marbleh, baker, adj tract Morse had from his fa and mo. Richard and Mary pearce; see also Brown(17). Joseph Morse m Hannah Man in Boston in 1735, in 1737 deeded Muscongus land to s-in-law Alex Young of Boston (m Rebecca Man 1738) with ment of "my br Richard Pearce." See also Brackett (3).

 Pioneers Maine Rivers pg 357; PEARCE, Richard, carpenter, bought land from Samoset at Muscongus 1642; married Elizabeth, dau of John Brown, of New Harbor; children John, born at Pemaquid 1644; Richard born 1647; Elizabeth (Fulford); Francis; Joseph; Margaret (Ward); Mary (Hamlin); Sarah (Stockwell); William; and George born 1666.

* *  DAR# 13419: John Pearce was a Master's Mate on the Frigate Boston commanded by Samuel Tucker, 1778. In 1780 he served on the Thorne & was brought a prisoner in the first cartel from R.I. He was about 75 when he died at Marblehead, 1827.
MA Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution, Vol. 12, page 18: Pearce, John. Master's Mate, frigate "Boston," commanded by Capt. Samuel Tucker; engaged 12/12/1778; reported sick at Marblehead 3/10/1779. Roll made up for advance pay for 1 month. ??? Page 18, Pearce, John. Seaman, sloop "Providence," commanded by Capt. Hoysteed Hacker; list of officers and men entitled to prize shares in the "Mellish" and "Active" [year not given]. Page 18: Pearce, John. List of prisoners brought to Marblehead in the cartel "Pacific" to be exchanged for British prisoners, as returned by Thomas Stone, Commissary [year not given]; said Pearce, a Seaman, reported taken in a prize of the "Columbus" retaken by the British ship "Liverpool."

Pioneers ME & NH pg 83: GOULD, GOLD, Alexander or Sander, New Harbor, or Pemaquid ME with his wife Margaret, had a deed of gift of a tract of land at Broad Bay from her father John Brown of New Harbor 8 Aug 1660. Daus Margaret, Mary & Elizabeth. [Eastern claims] One of these daus married James Stilson who petitioned Andros in 1689 giving some of these facts. 26 BROWN, John, New Harbor, Pemaquid, bought of the Indian sagamore Somerset or Samoset 7/15/1625, a tract of land extending from Pemaquid Falls to the head of New Harbor, thence to the south end of Muscongus island, running into the country North and by east 25 miles, then twenty eight miles northwest and by west, then south and by west to Pemaquid. Witnessed by Matthew Newman and William Cox. Acknowledged before Abraham Shurt 7/24/1626. [Me. Hist. Coll. V, 191-5.] /P/ This deed was recorded at Charlestown MA 12/26/1720 upon request of James Stillson and Margaret Stillson. [Book of Eastern Claims.] His son John Brown, of Framingham MA deposed 2/9/1720 aged about 85 years that he lived with his father at New Harbor, near Pemaquid till he was about 30 years old, and that during that time his brother in law Richard Pearse bought land of the Indians. /P/ His dau. Margaret m. Alexander Gould, q.v.
PEARCE, PIERCE, PEIRCE, Richard, carpenter, Muscongus, bought of "Capt. John summerset" [Samoset} Indian sagamore, a tract of land at Round Pond and Pemaquid river 1/9/1641. He is called "brother in law" by John Brown, Jr. of Pemaquid and Framingham. His children, Richard, born about 1647, John, born about 1652, George born about 1662, and Elizabeth (married Richard Fullford) removed to Salem MA. The sons testified to the above 11/29/1717 and made an agreement together with their deceased sister Elizabeth's daughter, Elizabeth, wife of Samuel Martin.

A History of the Towns of Briston & Bremen in the State of ME: But Richard Pearce this appears to have been his way of spelling the name who is conceded to have been a son of John Peirce did establish himself here as one of the very earliest permanent settlers of the place and left quite a numerous posterity of whom we shall have something to say in the progress of this work. John Brown whose daughter he married purchased land hereof the Indians in July 1625 but how long he had been in the place we do not know nor can we now tell whether Pearce's intimate relationship with the Brown family began before their immigration to this country. The probability seems to be that they all came together and it may be they came in an expedition sent out by Pearce's father immediately after the second disastrous return of his ship the Parragon in 1623. The fact that Brown afterwards purchased the same land from the Indians makes nothing against this view .When the patent of June 1st 1621 was issued in the name of John Peirce and his associates it was intended to be for the benefit of the colony then recently established at Plymouth Mass there can be no question of this. When therefore it is recited in the patent that whereas the said John Peirce and his Associates haue transported and vndertaken to transporte at their cost and chardges themselves and dyvers psons into New England and there to erect and build a Towne &c it was the beginning of the Plymouth colony that was referred to. There can be no escape from this though some have supposed that the language may have referred to another settlement previously begun here by Peirce. But if there may have been in former times some reason for such a suspicion the matter has been set at rest by the publication of fragments of the records of the Council for New England by the American Antiquarian Society. We may indeed suppose that two patents were issued the same day in the name of John Peirce in trust one for Plymouth and the other for a settlement elsewhere. But this is too improbable to be thought of for a moment. Mr Welles says further that some time after Peirce's settlement here was begun one Mr Brown made a purchase of a large tract of land of the natives and as Mr Peirce's was the most ancient grant thereabouts they united the grant from home with the purchase from the natives. But Mr Welles was not the author of this ingenious mode of representing these transactions it had been adopted by the Peirces as early as 1734. But probably we shall best regard it as an afterthought adopted by them to strengthen their supposed claim to a proprietary interest in the lands here by virtue of the irregular transactions of their ancestors. Thus John Brown third of the name in a quit claim deed to several of the Pearce family Sept 10 1734 says. To all people to whom these presents shall come John Brown of New Harbor in the county of York yeoman sendeth greeting &c Whereas my Hon Grandfather John Brown of said New Harbor Deceasd in his Life Time stood seized of a Large Tract of Land at and adjoining to sd New Harbor by Purchase of Capt John Summersett &c Indian Sachems as per their Deed Dated the 15th Day of July 1625 a Part of which Landa my said Grandfather gave to his Son in Law Richard Pearce of Mar blehead Decd and Instead of giving a Deed of said land to said Peirce he allowed the said Sachem to give a Deed of the Land to his Son in Law as per the Deed of said Sachem Summereett 9th Day of January 1641. Bounded beginning at Bound Pond Falls Extending North West four miles and so back to Pemaquid River which said Bounds Trench Partly on the Bounds of said New Harbor Purchase which said Purchase since the Death of my said Grand father and the Death of my Hon Father John Brown late of Damariscotta has been divided &C. The fact is well established that Brown did fully assent to the sale of the land referred to a part of his own tract to his son in law Pearce and by the same Indian sachem Samoset who sold it to him sixteen years before for his name appears as a witness on the deed  but not a word in it indicates that he at the time had any such thoughts as the interpretation afterward put on the transaction supposed Is it not more probable that he considered the deed his son in law was receiving from the untutored savages as of even less consequence than his own previous deed. But the fact that a son of John Peirce in whose name the first Plymouth patent was issued became a permanent resident here at so early a period coupled with the fact that the Plymouth people were greatly displeased with his father's doings and charged him with managing their affairs in view of selfish ends of his own must be considered as very significant. The Plymouth people did not confide in his integrity. It is said that in 1623 without consulting his associates he obtained another charter or patent ostensibly for the Plymouth colony but containing certain provisions designedly favoring his own selfish ends and those of his family. It is not now extant and what its special provisions were is not known but it was characterized in severe terms by Bradford and others. Subsequently May 18th 1623 the matter was settled by the payment to Peirce of 500 by the company but it is evident that it was not done without some bad feeling between the partie.s. Did Peirce immediately after this send his son Richard to this place accompanied perhaps by Brown and others with the view of establishing another settlement under the patent. This seems probable but no public announcement was ever made of such a transaction. Still it may have been that those were the very men who had taken possession of Pemaquid and of whom Samoset and other Indians of the place informed Levett at Capmanwagen Southport late in the autumn of the same year 1623. But no evidence has been found that Peirce ever intimated an intention to make such a use of the patent of June 1st 1621 and more important still so far as we know his son Richard during his lifetime here never put forward any claim based upon the provisions of that charter. Some points in the character and history of the patent are decidedly curious. First No metes or bounds are mentioned in it but Peirce and his associates were authorized to take possession anywhere between the 40th and 48th degrees of north latitude with only some restrictions in regard to other settlements. It might therefore have been located here without any violation of its own express provisions. Second the said patent so far as we can now learn after being sent to Gov Carver who however died before its arrival the same year it was given was never in the possession of John Pierce or his son Richard nor was it ever brought to Pemaquid or Muscongus where Richard Pearce lived Third The earliest date at which this patent of June 1 1621 is mentioned by the descendants of Richard Pearce as the foundation in whole or in part for their claim to lands in this place so far as has been discovered is that above given in John Brown's quit claim deed to several of the Pearces Sept 10th 1734. Several deeds of lands at Pemaquid of an earlier date are to be found on the York County Records given by persons styling themselves grand children of Richard Pearce and great grand children of John Brown of Pemaquid but they mention only as the foundation of their claims the purchase from the Indians in 1625 and the deed of gift of John Brown to his daughter Mrs Richard Pearce omitting entirely any allusion to the patent of 1621.. Fourth The patent referred to seems to have been in the custody of the Plymouth people a whole century and more without receiving any special attention or exciting particular inquiry but in 1727 great search was made for it and it could not be found. Again in 1733 1739 and 1741 the search was renewed in Plymouth, Ipswich, and Cambridge but without success. At length it is said Perez Bradford by request consented to aid in the search and after considerable exertion brought it to light and the fact was ascertained that it had been designedly concealed 1 May not the document have fallen into the hands of some one of the heirs of Richard Pearce who was carefully preserving it in order to strengthen the family claim to a proprietary interest in the lands here when the time should come for the settlement of the question. Nevertheless when the settlement was actually made early in the present century as we shall hereafer see only very slight reference was made to the patent by one or two of the claimants in the Peirce interest and the commissioners seem to have given it little if any attention. The purchase of laud at Pemaquid of the Indians by John Brown constitutes an important epoch in the history of the place. He probably came here directly from Bristol Eng and the following document copied from the records of that city makes us acquainted with some items of his history .Feb 21 1658 Robert Allen of Sheepscott River in New England planter came personally before me etc etc that for 17 years last past he well knew John Brown of New Harbor in New England mason who often told him that he was the son of Richard Brown of Barton Regis in Gloucester in England and that he married Margaret daughter of Francis Hayward of Bristol. Said Brown was alive and in good health in New England last June 3. The Indian deed to Brown is as follows. To all people whom it may concern Know ye that I Capt John Somerset and Unongoit Indian sagamores they being the proper heirs to all the lands on both sides of Muscongus river have bargained and sould to John Brown of New Harbor this certain tract or parcell of land as fol loweth that is to say beginning at Pemaquid Palls and Be running a direct course to the head of New Harbour from thence to the eouth end of Muscongus Island taking in the island and so running five and twenty miles into the country north and by east and thence eight miles north west and by west and then turning and running south and by west to Pemaquid where first begun. To all which lands above bounded the said Captain John Somerset and Unnongoit Indian Sagamores have granted and made over to the above said John Brown of New Harbour in and for consideration of fifty skins to us in hand paid to our full satisfaction for the above mentioned lands and we the above said sagamores do bind ourselves and our heirs forever to defend the above said John Brown and his heirs in the quiet and peaceable possession of the above said lands In witness whereunto I the said Capt John Somerset and Unnongoit have set our hands and seals this fifteenth day of July in the year of our Lord God one thousand six hundred and twenty five CAPT JOHN SOMERSET SEAL UNNONGOII SEAL Signed and sealed in presence of us MATTHEW NEWMAN, WM Cox July 24 1626. Capt John Somerset and Unnongoit Indian Sagamores personally appeared and acknowledged this instrument to be their act and deed at Pemaquid before me ABRAHAM SHURTE Charlestown December 26 1720 Read and at the request of James Stilson and his sister Margaret Hilton formerly Stilson they being claimers and heirs of said lands accordingly entered PER SAMUEL PHIPPS One of the Clerks of the Committee for Eastern Lands.
Richard Pearce (Pierce, Pearse) son of John Pearce of London Eng came early to this place perhaps at the same time with John Brown whose daughter Elizabeth he married. It has been conjectured that the marriage was at least contracted before they came to this country but it is only conjecture. Not much is known of Pearce except that he resided at Muscongus and had a large family. The names of nine children of his have been preserved as given below 1 Richard2 of whom nothing further is known 2 William2 do do 3 Joseph2 do do 4 Elizabeth2 who married Richard Fulworth or Fulford 5 George2 6 Margaret2 who married Nathaniel Ward 7 Francis2 or Frances2 who m ?. They had an only child a daughter named Elizabeth. This d married Edward Clarke at Gloucester Nov 24th 1718. Oct 17th 1729 Clarke and wife gave a quit claim deed of one half of their right title and interest in the John Brown Tract as sole heirs to Frances or Francis Pearce late of Muscougus the claim of the latter being for one ninth part of one quarter.

The History & Tradition of Marblehead: Early in the month of August the schooner Dolphin of Salem was captured by the British cruiser Belvidera. Among the unfortunate crew of the Dolphin who became prisoners of war was Joseph Furness of Marblehead. Shortly after his confinement on board the Belvidera he was carried on board the ship San Domingo where an attempt was made to impress him into the British naval service. 1 With manly heroism Furness declared that he would not fight against his country and told his captors to shoot him as he stood if they chose to do so. They then placed him on board the guard ship where his steady resolution and undaunted courage inspired the admiration of the British officers. Soon after documents were sent down for his release and he returned home. 1 Twenty one citizens of Marblehead were impressed into the British naval service namely John Smith, William Hooper, John Holden, Thomas Curtis, Samuel Brimblecom, Philip Brimblecom, Richard Pearce, Paul Newhall, Israel Eaton, Benjamin Ashton, William Eaton, John Nicholson, William Homan, Thomas Mitchell, Jacob Wadden, Ambrose Dodd, Williiim Mitchell ,Luke Mngan, Asa Prichard, William Ponsland, and Thomas Porter. /P/   March 19 1751 voted the thanks of the town to Robert Hooper Esq for his donation of a Fire Engine this day made to the town At the same meeting the fire department was organized by the election of a Board of Firewards as follows Voted That Capt Nathan Bowen Capt George New marsh Robert Hooper Esq Capt Richard Reed and Mr Jeremiah Lee be Firewards for the year ensuing The firewards were authorized to appoint a suitable company for the engine or any other engine which should belong to the town and to covenant with these appointed to work and govern them that they shall be exempt from military duty and from serving as fence viewers hog reeves or tything men so long as they shall serve in said company There appears to be no record of the names of those assigned to the engine but a few years later 1755 the fire wards appointed Robert Harris captain of the Great Fire Engine with the following company Will Bowden John Bowden Henry Trevett John Pearce Richard Wood William Bassett John Andrews Robert Harris John Ncul Joseph Bubier Benjamin Darling 3d Benjamin Doe 1st The engine presented by Mr Hooper undoubtedly 

Vital Records of Marblehead: PEARCE see also Pierce Ann and Samuel Brown Jan i 1765 Ann and Samuel Meservy Feb 13 1791, Anna and Joseph Hawley Sept 24 1750, Benjamin and Mary Neal Feb 10 1732, Benjamin and Tabitha Green July 30 1767, Benjamin of Salem and Betsy Peach Feb 15 1807, Charles and Mary L Andrews of Danvers int May i 1830, David R and Tabatha P Green Aug 31 1819, Deborah and Benjamin Wilkins Dec n 1746, Eli V and Mrs Sally Pearce Sept n 1834, Elizabeth and John Goodwin Nov 21 1752, Elizabeth and John Stacey Sept 3 1769,  Elizabeth and Finch Deacons Dec 23 1787, Elizabeth and Nicholas Bartlett Aug 28 1791, EIizabeth C Barns  and William Hawkes May 29 1791, George and Sarah Homan Aug 14 1800, c R 2 George and Deborah Knight Jan 18 1824, Hannah and Joseph Hawley Nov 26 1754, Hannah Mrs and Thomas Widger Feb 7 1809,  Jane and Eli Vickrey Oct 17 1752, Joanna and Asa Blaney June 27 1789, John and Elizabeth Merret Nov 30 1715, John and Elizabeth Dixey Aug 19 1746, John and Martha Tory Dec 29 1757, John and Mary Vickrey Jan 8 1765, John and Mrs Sarah Hooper May 21 1765, John Dea and Rebekah Mansfield July  1765, John Dea с R 2 and Mrs int Mary Chadwell July 2 r 1769, John and Elizabeth Rogers Dec 26 1771, John and Sarah Gould Mar i 1772, John and Hannah Maine Dec 17 1797, John and Mary Doliber Apr 10 1808, Joseph В and Rebecca Hammond Jan 28 1819, Martha and John Gersears Sept 29 1761, Martha and William Chadwell May 22 1788, Mary and Charles Wood Feb 25 1732 3 c R 3 , PEARCE Mary and Andrew Dennis Feb 3 1747, Mary and Benjamin John c R 2 Dodd Jan 5 1769, Mary and Edmund Brooks Dec 4 1788, Mary and John Merrett jr Jan 27 1793, Mary and George Melzard Aug 29 1793, Mary and John Ome Sept 8 1793, Mehitable and John Roads Aug 18 1746, Mehitable and Ephraim Kendall Aug 15 1802, Mehitable and William W Johnson Dec 8 1811, Mehitable and John Mason Mar 13 i814,  Nathaniel and Anna Laskin Sept 7 1762, Philip and Sarah Farow Nov 3 1782, Rebecca and John Rust of Boston int May 26 1805, Rebecca and Philip Thrasher jr Apr 9 1837, Rebeckah and Nathaniel Tarbox of Lynn June n 1752, Rebekah and Elias Mullet Nov 29 1744, Richard and Hannah Bassett r 22 1713, Robert and Mary Goodwin int July 25 1772, Robert and Abigail Upton of Middletown int Dec 31 1774, Robert and Mrs Jane Freto Sept 12 1802, Robert and Mrs c R i Elizabeth Hut man Feb 10 1811, Robert 3d and Mary Ann Davis Jan 26 1823, Robert and Sally LeMain Dec 19 1826, Sally Mrs and Eli V Pearce Sept n 1834, Sarah Mrs and Thomas Rowe Dec 25 1781, Sarah and Jonas Glover Aug 29 1784, Sarah and Robert Burridge Jan 20 1788, Sarah and William Peach jr int of Newbury Vt Jan 22 1800, Sarah and Benjamin Stevens June 7 1801, Sarah Mrs c R i and Isaac Atkins July 8 1804 CR i, Sarah Mrs and John Brown int Mar 14 1807, Tabitha and James Chapman May 13 1762, Tabitha and Thomas Green Nov 26 1797, William and Mehetabel Brown May 19 1789, PEARSE see also Pierce Anthony and Sara Libby April 1744 c R 3, Elizabeth and John Sowden Feb 8 1740, Robert and Ann Green July 23 1743 c R 3.

Publications of the Colonial Society of MA: John Peirce aged about Seventy four years Testifies and says that about the year of our Lord 1722 the Indian War breaking out at the Eastward this Deponant went with a Vessell and a Number of People to the Eastward aud Brought from thence his Father Richard Peirce and Family from a place called Muscongus where this Deponents sd Father aud Family then lived that this Deponent there saw Samuel Annis who then lived at a place called Round pond that the s Annis came on Board this Deponents vessell that this Deponent asked s Annis to bring his Family and Effects on board and Come away for fear of the Indians That the s Annis declined and said he would go some other way That this Deponent Came away & left s Annis at Round pond This Deponent further Testifies that he knew Hezekiah Eggleston now of Bristol in the County of Lincoln and that he is the reputed son of Hezekiah Eggleston late of Marblehead dec by Sarah his Wife both of whom this Deponent knew that the said Sarah was the reputed Daughter of Samuel Martin late of Marblehead dec by Elizabeth his Wife Both of whom this Deponent knew that the s Elizabeth was the Only reputed sister of Francis Fullford late of Marblehead whom this Deponent also knew that the said Elizabeth & Francis were the only reputed Children of Richard Fullford formerly of a place called Round pond in the Eastern part of This Province By his Wife Elizabeth That the said Elizabeth was the only reputed Daughter of Richard Peirce formerly of a place called Muscongus in the Eastern Part of this Province who was the Deponents reputed Grandfather JOHN PEARCE Essex ss Marblehead deposition taken 15 August 1768 before W BOURN J Pacis A true Copy Examin d by JON BOWMAN Cler 2

The Maine historical and genealogical recorder, Volume 2: JOHN PEARCE (jurat Marblehead) deposes 15 Aug 1768 aged about 74 that about the year 1722 the Indian war breaking out at the Eastward this Dep went with a vessel and a number of people to the Eastward and brought from thence his father Richard Peirce and family from Muscongus where they then lived that he saw there Samuel Annis who then lived at Round Pond and Annis declined to come with him and Dep left him there .Dep knew Hezekiah Eggleston now of Bristol that he is the reputed son of Hezekiah Eggleston late of Marblehead by Sarah his wife that said Sarah was the reputed daughter of Samuel Martin late of Marblehead deceased by Elizabeth his wife that the sd Elizabeth was the only reputed sister of Francis Fullford late of Marblehead that sd Elizabeth and Francis were the only reputed children of Richard Fullford formerly of Round Pond by his wife Elizabeth that the sd Elizabeth was the only daughter of Richard Peirce formerly of Muscongus who was this Deponent's reputed grandfather. Bailey VS Bodkin  177O (Cumberland Records 1-35)

Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Volume 4:...This little stream known in the ancient Records as Mill Creek the name of the river being taken from the buildings standing on it runs up eight or ten miles in an East North East direction and was the Eastern Boundary of that famous spot of land in the eyes of these ancient settlers and which was designated by them as The Great Neck. This settlement was probably begun as early as 1623 only three years after the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth. In 1607 a colony was planted at the mouth of the Kennebeck River but though it was broken up yet an acquaintance was formed by them by voyagers, fishermen, adventurers, and others of this entire region long before the pilgrims set their feet upon the comparatively barren shores of Plymouth. In 1621 Mr John Pierce,a citizen of London, obtained a patent of the Council of Plymouth to come and settle in New England. He commenced his settlement on Broad Bay Broad Cove about 12 mile to the East of this on the Muscongus River and there his posterity continued above one hundred years. This was the most ancient grant thereabouts and it is said that Mr Pierce's house was not burn in the time of the general massacre because he was friendly to the Indians. This fact is introduced to show that settlements were made on the coast at an early date. Although the precise year of founding this settlement is not known yet it is quite certain that it was done as early as the above named year for In 1630, says Sullivan, there were fifty families on what were called the Sheepscot Farms. The Duke de Rochefaucault in the 2nd volume of hie travels says Some attempts were made by the Dutch to settle a colony in the vicinity of Newcastle as early as 1625. Those of an earlier date were unsuccessful. That this settlement was of an early date both in its being founded and in its destruction is proved by the following fact. There is now in one of these cellars which is partially filled up the stump of a pine tree of nearly two feet in thickness which was cut.
    It reverted to the Crown of England But the days of this colony were soon numbered. It was destined to fall during James administration But a half century had passed away when the war between the New England colonies and King Phillip broke out and raged with terrible fury. The first attack was made upon Plymouth Mass June 24th 1675 just one hundred years before the commencement of the war of the Revolution. The flame quickly spread throughout New England and great were the Bufferings occasioned thereby. The war lasted till April 12th 1678 a little less than three years when a peace was ratified at Saco in the province of Maine. During that war the inhabitants suffered exceedingly. Distress prevailed on every side. Maine was completely overrun by the enemy and Falmouth together with almost every habitation East of it was burnt and their occupants were either driven off, murdered, or sold into merciless captivity. The Indians rallied and laid waste all these Eastern settlements. They first fell upon a trader's establishment at Stinson's Point Woolwich not far from the present ferry. This was kept by a man whose name was Richard Hammond. He had been a long time a trader with the Indians, and fhey complained of his cheating them. Once they said he filled them with strong drink and took away their furs. Remembering his offences a vindictive party of them visited the place whose looks and airs se frightened a young maid that she started to go away, but an Indian brought her back and told her she had nothing to fear. Still more terrified by a larger number of them who had just arrived, she escaped and traveled over land 15 miles to Sheepscot Plantation where she gave the alarm and the terrified inhabitants immediately fled leaving all their possessions behind them. They had only fairly got away from them when the savage warriors arrived set up their fiendish warwhoop then set fire to the buildings killed the sheep and the cattle and thus destroyed the labor and care of years. The terrified inhabitants fled on board the vessel that was building in the harbor and thus saved themselves from the fury of an unrelenting foe. There is an old tradition among the inhabitants here handed down from an old Indian who told it to Capt James Cargill the Grandfather of Joseph and one of the earliest of the present race of settlers that the savages warned the inhabitants off and gave them a certain time to go and that they fled on board the vessel which was building in the harbor before she was finished and went away. Whether the Indians warned them off or not it is certain that they took shipping as stated by Cotton Mather in Sir Wm Phipp's unfinished vessel. At that time all the settlements on the Kennebeck river together with those on Parker's and Arrowswick Islands, Cape Newaggan, Damariscove, New Harbor, Muscongus, Damariscotta, Pemaquid, St George, besides scattered buildings in various places were entirely consumed. The heathen left nothing remaining and the land lay desolate many years.
   John Pierce of Manchester in the county of Essex aged about 90 years certifies and says that about 80 years ago being then about ten years old 1654 he was at Damariscotta at the house of John Brown who then lived on the eastward side of the river near the salt water falls and then possessed a large tract of land tending downwards from thence towards Pemaquid to smelt brook it being about 2 miles and so backwards to Pemaquid fresh river also mowed two meadows adjoining the said Pierce helping to make the hay at several times from said time to King Phillips war at which time said Brown was driven off Further saith that at the same time John Taylor lived on the west side of the river opposite to said John Brown and that his southern bounds of his possession was a great gully west northwards of Walter Phillips house about half way between said Phillips and said Taylor's house and at a place called the three courses and from thence northwards taking in the Oyster shell neck and so up the country towards the fresh pond and and also back through the fresh meadow westward all which said Taylor possessed quietly and peacably from that time to King Phillip's Indian war. Also he had a son named Isaac. Further saith that Walter Phillips at that time had a cart path that went directly back from his dwelling house towards Sheepscot below the fresh meadow leaving the meadow on the right hand. Further saith that Robert Scott at the same time lived at said Damariscotta on the east side of the river west northward of John Brown's and that his dwelling house was situated about east from the great bank of Oyster shells that is on the point of the neck on the west side of the river all possessed by him from said time till King Phillip's war and further saith that he does not remember that there were any other inhabitants but the within named that lived at the head of said river during said term of time. Essex ss January 6 1734.  

 A History Of The Towns Of Bristol And Bremen In The State OF Maine: The Plymouth Patent of June 1st 1621 in the name of John Peirce, Richard Pearce son of John Peirce and his father in law John Brown become permanent settlers at Pemaquid. Statement of Samuel Welles of Boston. Brown's purchase of two Indian sagamores. Abraham Shurte purchases Monhegan for Aldsworth and Elbridge 1620 25. We come now to a period in the history of this place concerning some points of which there is much ohscurity not to say mystery. It is well known that when the Plymouth colony arrived on the coast of Massachusetts in November 1620 they were without a charter or rather the charter they had obtained from the London or South Virginia company was useless for the reason that they had come so far to the north as to be beyond the jurisdiction of that company. They therefore by the return of the Mayflower made application for a charter from the Plymouth or North Virginia company or rather to the successors of this company now styled the Council for New England or Plymouth Council on whose territory they found themselves located. This charter was readily granted and was issued June 1 1621 in the nameof John Peirce citizen and clothworker of London and his associates. It was brought to Plymouth in the ship Fortune which arrived in Nov 1621. That it thus came into the possession of the colony is certain but it does not appear that they ever made any use of it. The same patent or charter however long subsequently was made use of by descendants of Peirce as the basis of a claim to lands at Pemaquid which was prosecuted with vigor. This patent was of a singular character mentioning no metes and bounds but simply reciting the fact that a settlement had been commenced in New England, it gave to John Peirce and his associates and his and their heirs and assigns one hundred acres of ground for every person who should be transported by them and continue in the country three years with a long detail of limitations restrictions and conditions. And inasmuch as churches, schools, hospitals, bridges, etc. were to be built, fifteen hundred acres additional to that above provided for were given to the undertakers for these purposes. So also on certain other conditions every emigrant was to have fifty more acres allotted to him after a settlement should be fairly begun and due return made of their transactions. Power was at the same time given to enact necessary laws and appoint necessary officers for the government of the colony and to exclude all intruders. Less than a year after the issuing of this patent April 20th 1622, Mr Peirce in some way unfairly as was charged by his associates obtained another patent which produced considerable dissatisfaction but in May 1623 the difficulty was settled and Peirce resigned the patent to the company for the consideration of 500 pounds. Some months before thus closing his connection with the colony he had at great expense fitted out the ship Paragon and dispatched her with many passengers for the new settlement but being forced back by the weather he at great additional expense again fitted her for sea and embarked in her himself with one hundred and nine passengers. Unfortunately after making half the distance across the Atlantic she was again obliged to return and Peirce's name no more appears in connection with the Plymouth colony. But only a few years later than this a Mr Richard Pearce who is claimed to have been a son of John Peirce is found as a permanent resident of Pemaquid or rather Muscongus and after the lapse of a century or more some of his descendants laid claim to a large tract of land here basing their claim in part upon this very patent of June 1st 1621. The subject is very fully presented in the following document of Samuel Welles of Boston. This may certify all concerned that I have in my hand a certain patent signed by the Earl of Warwick and several other members of the Council of Plymouth in England dated June 1st 1621, about three years after the patent constituting the Council of Plymouth for ordering the affairs and settlement of New England that is of land between the 40th and 48th degrees of north latitude. The sum and substance of this patent of June 1st 1621 is a grant to one John Pierce a citizen of London of liberty to come and settle in New England with divers privileges in such place as he or his associates should choose under certain limitations of not interfering with other grants or settling within ten miles of any other settlement unless on the opposite side of some great navigable river and on return made to have further grants and privileges. Now as I am informed and hear it is agreed on all hands Mr Pierce came over and here settled that is at a place called Broad Bay and there his posterity continued above one hundred years sometime after the settlement was begun one Mr Brown made a purchase of a large tract of land of the natives and as Mr Pierce's was the most ancient grant thereabout they united the grant from home with the purchase of the natives and it is said that the Indians have ever acknowledged the justice of our claims and never would burn Pierce's house even though he left it. Boston 11th September 1755 Samuel Welles. 1 The author of this statement was a native of Connecticut but lived in Boston where he was held in high estimation and often appointed to offices of great trust and responsibility. We may believe that he would not make such a declaration without due consideration nor without evidence satisfactory to himself of its truth but that John Peirce after holding the relation he did to the Pilgrim Fathers could come to this country and even undertake to found a permanent settlement on the coast no farther than this from the Plymouth settlement and the fact entirely escape mention in contemporary history until the middle of the last century is extremely improbable. The language of Mr Welles plainly implies that his information was derived chiefly if not entirely from Peirce's descendants and even with them it was preserved by tradition only except so far as evidence was furnished by the patent itself. But Richard Pearce this appears to have been his way of spelling the name who is conceded to have been a son of John Peirce did establish himself here as one of the very earliest permanent settlers of the place and left quite a numerous posterity of whom we shall have something to say in the progress of this work. John Brown whose daughter he married purchased land here of the Indians in July 1625 but how long he had been in the place we do not know nor can we now tell whether Pearce's intimate relationship with the Brown family began before their immigration to this country. The probability seems to be that they all came together and it may be they came in an expedition sent out by Pearce's father immediately after the second disastrous return of his ship the Parragon in 1623. The fact that Brown afterwards purchased the same land from the Indians makes nothing against this view. When the patent of June 1st 1621 was issued in the name of John Peirce and his associates it was intended to be for the benefit of the colony then recently established at Plymouth Mass there can be no question of this. When therefore it is recited in the patent that whereas the said John Peirce and his Associates have transported and undertaken to transporte at their cost and chardges themselves and dyvers psons into New England and there to erect and build a Towne &c. it was the beginning of the Plymouth colony that was referred to. There can be no escape from this though some have supposed that the language may have referred to another settlement previously begun here by Peirce. But if there may have been in former times some reason for such a suspicion the matter has been set at rest by the publication of fragments of the records of the Council for New England by the American Antiquarian Society. 1 We may indeed suppose that two patents were issued the same day in the name of John Peirce in trust one for Plymouth and the other for a settlement elsewhere. But this is too improbable to be thought of for a moment. Mr Welles says further that some time after Peirce's settlement here was begun one Mr Brown made a purchase of a large tract of land of the natives and as Mr Peirce's was the most ancient grant thereabouts they united the grant from home with the purchase from the natives &c. But Mr Welles was not the author of this ingenious mode of representing these transactions it had been adopted by the Peirces as early as 1734. But probably we shall best regard it as an afterthought adopted by them to strengthen their supposed claim to a proprietary interest in the lands here by virtue of the irregular transactions of their ancestors. Thus John Brown third of the name in a quit claim deed to several of the Pearce family Sept 10 1734 says. To all people to whom these presents shall come John Brown of New Harbor in the county of York yeoman sendeth greeting &c Whereas my Honbl Grandfather John Brown of said New Harbor Deceasd in his Life Time stood seized of a Large Tract of Land at add adjoining to Bd New Harbor by Purchase of Capt John Summersett &c Indian Sachems as per their Deed Dated the 15th Day of July 1625 a Part of which Lands my said Grandfather gave to his Son in Law Richard Pearce of Marblehead Decd and Instead of giving a Deed of said land to said Peirce he allowed the said Sachem to give a Deed of the Land to his Son in Law as per the Deed of said Sachem Summersett 9th Day of January 1641 Bounded beginning at Round Pond Falls, Extending North West four miles and so back to Pemaquid River which said Bounds Trench Partly on the Bounds of said New Harbor Purchase which said Purchase since the Death of my said Grand father and the Death of my Honbl Father John Brown late of Damariscotta has been divided &c 1. The fact is well established that Brown did fully assent to the sale of the land referred to a part of his own tract to his son in law Pearce and by the same Indian sachem Samoset who sold it to him sixteen years before for his name appears as a witness on the deed 2 but not a word in it indicates that he at the time had any such thoughts as the interpretation afterward put on the transaction supposed. Is it not more probable that he considered the deed his son in law was receiving from the untutored savages as of even less consequence than his own previous deed. But the fact that a son of John Peirce in whose name the first Plymouth patent was issued became a permanent resident here at so early a period coupled with the fact that the Plymouth people were greatly displeased with his father's doings and charged him with managing their affairs in view of selfish ends of his own must be considered as very significant. The Plymouth people did not confide in his integrity. It is said that in 1623 without consulting his associates he obtained another charter or patent ostensibly for the Plymouth colony but containing certain provisions designedly favoring his own selfish ends and those of his family. It is not now extant and what its special provisions were is not known but it was characterized in severe terms by Bradford and others. Subsequently May 18th 1623 the matter was settled by the payment to Peirce of 500 by the company but it is evident that it was not done without some bad feeling between the parties. Did Peirce immediately after this send his son Richard to this place accompanied perhaps by Brown and others with the view of establishing another settlement under the patent. This seems probable but no public announcement was ever made of such a transaction .Still it may have been that those were the very men who had taken possession of Pemaquid and of whom Samoset and other Indians of the place informed Levett at Capmanwagen Southport late in the autumn of the same year 1623.1 But no evidence has been found that Peirce ever intimated an intention to make such a use of the patent of June 1st 1621 and more important still so far as we know his son Richard during his lifetime here never put forward any claim based upon the provisions of that charter. Some points in the character and history of the patent are decidedly curious. First No metes or bounds are mentioned in it but Peirce and his associates were authorized to take possession anywhere between the 40th and 48th degrees of north latitude with only some restrictions in regard to other settlements. It might therefore have been located here without any violation of its own express provisions. Second the said patent so far as we can now learn after being sent to Gov Carver who however died before its arrival the same year it was given was never in the possession of John Pierce or his son Richard nor was it ever brought to Pemaquid or Muscongus where Richard Pearce lived. Third The earliest date at which this patent of June 1 1621 is mentioned by the descendants of Richard Pearce as the foundation in whole or in part for their claim to lands in this place so far as has been discovered is that above given in John Brown's quit claim deed to several of the Pearces Sept 10th 1734. Several deeds of lands at Pemaquid of an earlier date are to be found on the York County Records given by persons styling themselves grand children of Richard Pearce and great grand children of John Brown of Pemaquid but they mention only as the foundation of their claims the purchase from the Indians in 1625 and the deed of gift of John Brown to his daughter Mrs Richard Pearce omitting entirely any allusion to the patent of 1621. Fourth The patent referred to seems to have been in the custody of the Plymouth people a whole century and more without receiving any special attention or exciting particular inquiry but in 1727 great search was made for it and it could not be found. Again in 1733 1739 and 1741 the search was renewed in Plymouth Ipswich and Cambridge but without success. At length it is said Perez Bradford by request consented to aid in the search and after considerable exertion brought it to light and the fact was ascertained that it had been designedly concealed 1 May not the document have fallen into the hands of some one of the heirs of Richard Pearce who was carefully preserving it in order to strengthen the family claim to a proprietary interest in the lands here when the time should come for the settlement of the question. Nevertheless when the settlement was actually made early in the present century as we shall hereafter see only very slight reference was made to the patent by one or two of the claimants in the Peirce interest and the commissioners seem to have given it little if any attention. The purchase of land at Pemaquid of the Indians by John Brown constitutes an important epoch in the history of the place. He probably came here directly from Bristol Eng and the following document copied from the records of that city makes us acquainted with some items of his history. Feb 21 1658 Robert Allen of Sheepscott River in New England planter came personally before me etc etc that for 17 years last past he well knew John Brown of New Harbor in New England mason who often told him that he was the son of Richard Brown of Barton Regis in Gloucester in England and that he married Margaret daughter of Francis Hayward of Bristol. Said Brown was alive and in good health in New England last June 3. The Indian deed to Brown is as follows 4 To all people whom it may concern Know ye that I Capt John Somerset and Unongoit Indian sagamores they being the proper heirs to all the lands on both sides of Muscongus river have bargained and sould to John Brown of New Harbor this certain tract or parcell of land as followeth that is to say beginning at Pemaquid Falls and so running a direct course to the head of New Harbour from thence to the south end of Muscongus Island taking in the island and so running five and twenty miles into the country north and by east and thence eight miles north west and by west and then turning and running south and by west to Pemaquid where first begun. To all which lands above bounded the said Captain John Somerset and Unnongoit Indian Sagamores have granted and made over to the above said John Brown of New Harbour in and for consideration of fifty skins to us in hand paid to our full satisfaction for the above mentioned lands and we the above said sagamores do bind ourselves and our heirs forever to defend the above said John Brown and his heirs in the quiet and peaceable possession of the above said lands In witness whereunto I the said Capt John Somerset and Unnongoit have set our hands and seals this fifteenth day of July in the year of our Lord God one thousand six hundred and twenty five. Capt John Somerset seal Unnongois seal Signed and sealed in presence of us Matthew Newman, Wm Cox, July 24 1626.Capt John Somerset and Unnongoit Indian Sagamores personally appeared and acknowledged this instrument to be their act and deed at Pemaquid before me Abraham Shurte Charlestown December 26 1720. Read and at the request of James Stilson and his sister Margaret Hilton formerly Stilson they being claimers and heirs of said lands accordingly entered Per Samuel Phipps One of the Clerks of the Committee for Eastern Lands. The two witnesses to this deed were probably men who had come with Brown from England but nothing is now known of the first Matthew Newman 1. Wm Cox became a resident of the place and his posterity of the same name are still here. The late Capt Israel Cox who many years occupied a place on the board of selectmen of the town of Bristol and died only a few years ago claimed that this Wm Cox was his great grandfather's father. He continued to reside here but the time of his death is not known. All of the name of Cox now in this. 1 It is remarkable that thirty five years after this transaction that is in the year 1660 the same names Matthew Newman and Wm Cox appear as witnesses to a deed from John Brown of New Harbor to Sander Gould and his wife who was Brown's daughter. Lincoln Report 1811 p 121 123 region and on the Kennebec are believed to have descended from him and it may be farther added that of all the settlers who came here from this period until the close of the century when the place was destroyed by the Indians the names of Cox and Hilton appear to be the only ones now perpetuated in the place Brown lived near New Harbor and is therefore in the old records frequently called John Brown of New Harbor but being a man of great enterprise in 1639 be purchased more land of the Indians at a place called Naquassett now Woolwich on the Kennebec river and removed there In the year 1641 his name appears as a witness to an Indian deed of lands at Muscongus to his son in law Richard Pierce the land being a part of the same he had purchased of the Indians in 1625/ We have already seen the interpretation given to this transaction by Peirce's descendants In 1646 he sold his lands at Nequasset and returned to Pemaquid but in 1654 he was living at Damariscotta. Phillips Taylor and Scott being his neighbors. By some it is added that he died in 1670 probably at Damariscotta but according to a deposition of Benjamin Prescott of Danvers made in Salem in 1765 he lived with his son John Brown Jr at Boston the last years of his life. These four John Brown, John Taylor, Walter Phillips, and Robert Scott were the only men having families who then lived at Damariscotta Salt Water Falls where the bridge now is. Scott lived on the east side directly opposite the great bank of oyster shells and Brown's House was south of him. Phillips and Taylor lived on the west side. During the war called King Philips war about the year 1676 they were all obliged to make their escape in the best way they could. Brown left three children John Brown Jr and two daughters Margaret who married Sander or Alexander Gould and long resided in the place, and Elizabeth who married Richard Peirce or Pearce. The acknowledgement of this deed it will be observed was made before Abraham Shurte at Pemaquid only a year after it was given Shurte does not append any title to his name.

Ranger, Schooner, John Pearce master, 55 tons, 6 men, built in N England 1762, registered Salem 23d March 1773. Owners present voyage, John Pearce junr.; cargoe 120 Bushels of Corn, 382 Barrels of Flour, 800 feet of Walnut Plank, 100 Bushels of Rye. Cleared for Marblehead May 27, 1773.
Ranger, Schooner, John Pearce, Master, 55 Tons, 6 men built in N England 1762, registered Salem 23d March 1773. Owner present voyage, John Pearce .Cargo 3 Hhds & 3 Bbls Rum, 7 Qu Casks Wine ,10 Barrels of Bro Sugar, 384 Gallons of Rum, 196 Gallons of Wine, 2758 Pounds of bro Sugar ,7 Bbls Cyder, 4 Desks. Sundry Earthern Ware, 15 Tables, 1 Case of Drawers, 4 quint Fish, 3 Doz & half of Chairs, 42 Pair of Shoes, 3 Dozen Axes, 43 Casks of Raisins, 8 Boxes Lemons, 20 Gross Corks Entered from Salem April 7, 1773. Bond given at Salem 23 March, 1773.  

Marblehead Museum.org/Marblehead-1700.pdf: Estate of Samuel Merritt House. Samuel Merritt of Marble died possessed of this small house and lot in or before 1697; and his Administrator conveyed the estate to Nicholas Merritt of Marblehead, fisherman, for 45 pounds Oct. 20, 1710. Nicholas Merritt was a brother of the deceased, and, in consideration of love, he conveyed the house and land to his daughter Elizabeth and her husband John Pearce of Marblehead, baker, Dec. 24, 1735. Mr. & Mrs. Pearce conveyed the house and land to Robert Gifford of Marblehead, fisherman, Feb. 17. 1738 and probably the house was removed.

Documentary history of the State of Maine, Volume 9 : The Deposition of Richard Pearce Senr of ye Age of Seventy Years Testifieth and Saith That I knew Richard Fullford and wife ye Parents of Elizabeth Martin the wife of Samuel Martin now of Marblehead in the County of Essex Fisherman or Shoreman and of Francis Fullford of Marblehead aforesaid Fisherman her brother and the said Richard Fullford and wife Lived on a place called Round Pound fronting to the Eastward against Misconcus Island distant from Pemmaquid River about five miles and that he had a House on said Land above fifty Years agoe and that I and Morrice Champnie mowed in the meadows of said Richard Fullford Severall years and his Land was bounded on ye Westward on pancake hill and on the Eastward with a place called Beartree Joyning on the Land of my Father Richard Pearce on the Northward on Pemmaquid fresh River and on the Southward with the River over against Misconcus Island with the dry Pound meadows thereto adjoyning and that ye Richard Fullford and his Family Lived on said Lands and possessed them and no other Person many Years togather without Molestation or Disturbance till ye Indian Enemy drove him and his Family from thence. Exam d.
The Deposition of John Pearce of Sixty five Years of Age Testifleth to the truth of the above Deposition of my brother Richard Pearce and that about thirty Years ago I knew the said Richard Fullford and Family remove to the abovesaid Land of Round Pound where he first Lived and that he then also built a house and Lived there about five or six years till the Indian Enemy drove him and Family from thence the Second time.
   Marblehead November 29, 1717. The above named Richard Pearce and John Pearce Appeared before me and made Oath to the truth of their Severall and Respective Depositions Edward Brattle Justice Peace Marblehead. November 29 1717. The above named Morrice Champnie appeared before me and made Oath to the truth of the above Deposition Edward Brattle Justice Peace.
   Examd ss Essex The aforegoing is a Copy of Record as appears in the office for the Registry of Deeds &c for the County of Essex Libro 37 Folio 257 &c Examind g John Higginson Register.
The Deposition of George Pearce of the Age of Fifty five Years Testifieth & Saith that about three Years ago in ye Year 1717 I was present when my two brothers Richard & John Pearce and my Self with Francis Fullfood & Elizabeth Martin ye Children my Sister Elizabeth Fulfood did Settle our Fathers Estate at Misconcus to the Eastward and then my said brother Richard Pearce did Declare and own that he had no right Title or Interest to an Island Called Hogg Island lying in Misconcus River against Misconcus Harbour but the said Hogg Island was the right & Estate of his brother John Pearce and Elizabeth Fullford his sister and their heirs and that my said brother Richaid Pearce for himself & his heirs Executors & Administrators did Dis claime and Disowne any right Title or Interest to said Hogg Island was given by John Summerset a Sagamore of ye Indians to his brother John & his said Sister Elizabeth them & their heirs forever and that his father did take possession of said Hogg Island for his said two Children their heirs and Assigns forever and further I Testify and Declare that I also the Deponant Reenounce all right Title and Intrest to said Hogg Island & that said Hogg Island was not Inventoried as any Part of my Father Estate but was Left as the Estate of my brother John Pearce and ye Children of my Sister Elizabeth Fullford his mark George & Pearce Essex ss.
   The above named George Pearce personally Appeared before us two of His Majestys Justices of ye Peace Quoram Unus and he made Oath to the truth of his above written Deposition in perpetuam Rei moriam Dated at Marblehead ye 7 Day of February 1720 21 Nathaniel Norden, Azor Gale Examd.
   The Deposition of John Pearce of the Age of Sixty eight years or Thereabouts Testifieth & Saith to my Certain Knowledge that the Island Commonly know and called Hogg Island lying in Misconcus River lying against Misconcus Harbour lying to the Northward of the Lands of Pemmaquid to the Eastward Formerly under the Government of New York was wholly and Absolutely given and bequeathed to me the Deponant and to my Sister Elizabeth Pearce alias Elizabeth Fullfood who married Richard Fullfood late of Misconcus Decd by John Summersett one of the Sagamores of the Indians then Living in these Parts to me the said John Pearce and to my said Sister Elizabeth to us our Heirs Executors Administrators & Assigns forever And that my Father Richard Pearce then Liveing but now Decd did take Possession of said Hogg Island for us his said Children and in our names as our own proper Estate of Inheritance forever to us our Heirs and Assigns to enjoy and possess the same and that our said Father Richard Pearce in his Lifetime always declared and reserved said Hogg Island for us his said two Children and their Heirs and that the said Hogg Island was not Inventoried as any Part of his Estate and I Further Testify & Declare that about three years ago when my brother Richard Pearce, George Pearce, Francis Fullfood, and Elizabeth Martin ye Children of my said Sister Elizabeth and my Self did Settle the Estate of our said Father he the said Richard Pearce my brother did then declare and own that he had no Intrest or part in said Hogg Island and that he knew that said Hogg Island was given by said John Summersett Sagamore to us the said Brother as the proper Estate of inheritance and I further Declare & Testify that 1 the Deponant since our said Division of our said Fathers Estate have taken possession of the Southermost part of said Hogg Island being the one half or Moiety of said Island as my proper Estate and have left ye Northermost half of said Hogg sland for my said Sisters Children as their proper Estate of Inheritance. Lattimore Watters, Norden Pedrick, his mark John 0 Pearce.
   Essex ss The above named John Pearce personally Appeared before us two of his Majestys Justices of the Peace Quorum Unus and he made Oath to the truth of his above written Deposition in perpetuani Rei memoriam Dated at Marblehead ye 7 th Day of February 1720/21 Nathll Norden, Azor Gale.
   The Deposition of Morrice Champney of the age of Seventy nine Years Testifieth and Saith That I knew Richard Fullfood & wife ye Parents of Elizabeth Martin the Wife of Samuel Martin now of Marblehead in the County of Essex Fisherman or Shoreman and of Francis Fullfood of Marblehead aforesaid Fisherman her brother and the said Richard Fullfood and his wife Lived on a place called Round Pound fronting against Misconcus Island to the Eastward above fifty years agoe and that he had a house on said Land how much Land he had I know not and I and Richard Pearce now Liveing in Marblehead moued on ye meadow Land Several years for said Richard Fullford and that the said Richard Fullford and his wife and family Lived on said Land of Round Pound many Years together till ye Indian Enemy drove them from thence. 

  Ancient dominions of Maine: embracing the earliest facts: From Monhegan and Pemaquid the attractive harbors of the Main had even now drawn pioneer 1621 settlers for on the margins of Broad Bay  in Bristol we find John Pierce had made a clearing and founded a new home.
   Richard Pierce, William Hilton, and John Brown Jr returned to the ancient plantations of Broad Cove in Bristol Muscongus and New Harbor. Many natives at this period visited at Thomas's house which stood on the point a little below the lower falls of the Damariscotta among whom was Newormet and a very aged squaw who said she formerly lived at this place and that her husband was the son of him who sold the land.
   ACQUISITION OF A TITLE TO BRISTOL. Fifty skins of beaver paid by Brown of New Harbor to the Pemaquid Sagamore Sommerset 1625 purchased the present territory of the towns of Bristol and Damariscotta. Edward Ashley agent and William Pierce assistant in right of a grant under the Muscongus Patent took possession of the eastern margin of the St George's river five miles below the head of tide water. There they erected a truck house and established a trading post employing five persons and a small new made vessel in the trade Thus the site of the present thrifty and populous town of Thomaston was selected and improved
   DAMARISCOTTA LAID WASTE. Another war party appeared on Walpole heights. The home of the Hustons was destroyed. The mother and daughter were slain and the father dragged into captivity. On the Newcastle side near the scat of the Hon E Farley, Mrs Gray and six children were cut off. At Muscongus and Broad Cove in Bristol Wm Hilton was killed while John Pearce took a vessel and thirty men with his aged father and family and thus escaped by water. Dr Kenelem Winslow was seized at his garrison on the Newcastle margin of Damariscotta taken to Loud's Island near Round Pond and there cruelly put to death. The ancient Walter Philips plantation was now a second time reduced to a state of solitude and desolation.

 Report and transactions, Volume 14 By Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature and Art: We now return to the fortunes of the Plymouth Company. Great as were the powers conceded the work of settlement was not to be initiated by them. The story of the voyage of the Pilgrim Fathers is too familiar to need recapitulation. Before the Company had renewed its operations on the sixth day of September 1620, thirteen years after the first colonization of Virginia, two months before the concession of the grand charter of Plymouth without any warrant from the sovereign of England, without any useful charter from a corporate body, the passengers in the Mayflower set sail from the waters of Plymouth Sound for a new world. Bound for the district of the Hudson in the territory of the London Company, they landed November 9th in the domains of the Plymouth Association and thus founded New Plymouth, the first permanent settlement in New England. The Huguenots were then at Port Royal or Annapolis founded 1604, the London Company at Jamestown 1607, the Dutch at New York 1614. The large concessions made by James provoked hostility. The Plymouth Company were first assailed in their attempt to limit the right of fishing Coke declared their charter void .Two years after it was granted there were as many as thirty five vessels from the West of England fishing on the New England coasts. An appeal from the Company to James procured a proclamation forbidding all access to the northern coast of America except with the special leave of the Company of Plymouth or of the Privy Council. It was alleged that the interlopers sold arms to the natives and taught their use. In 1623 Francis West was commissioned as Admiral of New England to put an end to unlicensed fishing. His efforts failed for the fishermen were stubborn fellows, too strong for him. Nor was the appointment of Robert Gorges son of Sir Ferdinando who had a grant made him in Massachusetts Bay as Lieutenant General of New England one whit more effectual in restraining interloping. Meanwhile the House of Commons took the matter up in earnest and a bill was passed declaring that fishing should be free. Coke telling Gorges to his face. The ends of private gain are concealed under cover of planting a colony an assertion which with the full facts before us it is impossible wholly to deny. Indeed this was much too near the truth to be pleasant. It had been found much easier to trade than to settle. Nevertheless settlement was encouraged though the patentees took chief care of themselves. The earliest grant I have been able to trace under the Council of Plymouth is one made on June 21st 1621 to John Pierce of London. A hundred acres of land were allotted by the Company for every person Pierce took with him and a grant of 1,500 more in consideration of Pierce and his associates undertaking to build churches hospitals and bridges. Pierce settled at Pemaquid subsequently joining with one John Brown who on July 15th 1625 bought a tract of land there eight miles by twenty five of two Indian chiefs for fifty skins. It was through Pierce in 1622 that the patent was granted under which the Plymouth colony was formally chartered.
  
There is not so far as I am aware any complete record of the land grants made by the Council of Plymouth but I have been enabled to trace the following: 1621 John Pierce of London liberty to settle Pemaquid. 1622 Patent to Weston for Weymouth the first plantation in Boston harbour abandoned in 1623. 1622 Sir F Gorges and Capt Mason lands between the Merrimac and Kennebec inoperative wholly or in part but afterwards confirmed 1623 Robert Gorges lands in Massachusetts. 1623 Patent to John Pierce for the Plymouth colony. He subsequently obtained another in his own favour but meeting with disaster sold it for 500 to the adventurers who had set out the Plymouth colony in England.

 The life of Samuel Tucker, Commodore in the American Revolution:  Adventurers resorted to Pemaquid not long after its discovery and for several years it was a station for trade in fish and furs. The fishermen frequented its fine harbors and spread their flakes on the shores and in 1620 there were said to be several houses in that locality but the most certain account is that John Pierce of London in 1622 3 under a charter of the Plymouth Council occupied it permanently In the summer of 1625. John Brown of New Harbor purchased these premises with other adjacent lands of John Somerset or Samoset Sachem of Pemaquid by deed dated June 15 1625 for fifty skins of beaver. There was also a patent granted by the Plymouth Company to Robert Aklsworth and Giles Elbridge in 1631 of a tract which included Pemaquid and afterwards in 1664 Charles II gave his brother James Duke of York the lands lying between Pemaquid River and St Croix but in 1753 Shem Drowne set up a claim to these premises under Aldsworth's title. Thus a fruitful source of lawsuits for a coming generation was laid in this nest of litigation to disturb the public peace at a future day as will appear in the next chapter.

 History of Boothbay, Southport and Boothbay Harbor, Maine. 1623-1905: John Pierce never came to America so Johnson states. Some have thought he lived once at Pemaquid but this is probably an error. His son and descendants lived at Marblehead and their residence there the similarity of family names with other reasons makes it strongly presumptive that he was the ancestor of the Pierce family so numerous in Boothbay and South port The four brothers Joseph, Samuel, Sylvester, and David Pierce came to Cape Newagen from Marblehead before the Revolution.

The Farnham papers: In respect to the First Plymouth Patent to John Pierce citizen and clothworker of London June 1/11 1621, it is interesting to note that it is the first grant of which an record is made by the Great Council under their charter of 1620. It is also believed to be the oldest State document in the United States. For many years the patent was lost and only after much search was discovered in 1741 among a mass of old papers in the land office Boston, in 1853 it was deposited in Pilgrim Hall Plymouth. Although the patent was little more than a general commission to Pierce to establish himself anywhere in New England on land not already occupied by any English, it has been claimed that a settlement was begun under its provisions at a place called Broad Bay within the limits of ancient Pemaquid.

John Pierce/Pearce. Service MA Rank Master of a Ship, Mate on a Ship. Baptized 5/24/1747 Marblehead MA. Death 3/9/1823 Marblehead MA. Service - Capt. Tucker. Spouse Elizabeth Rogers Doliber. # 13419 & 35901 Lucy Pearce & John Hancock Smith
DAR - John Pearce was master's mate on the frigate Boston commanded by Samuel Tucker 1778. In 1780 he served on the Thorne and was brought a prisoner in the first cartel from Rhode Island. He was about seventy five when he died at Marblehead 1827. 

[Marblehead MA Old Burial Hill - John Pearce, a.24y., 24 April 1800 (Marblehead Vital Records: John Pearce, s. John and Betsey, bp. 26 Feb. 1775, C.R.2) http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ccridland/P2.htm? ]

Founders and Patriots of America Index: Pearce, John (1588-Aug 19, 1661) m. ... Elizabeth .... MASS XXVII, 213; XXXII, 204; XXXIII, 20, 21

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